Past Congresses

There have been several Fourth World Congresses of Psychogeography. The last Congress was in 2019.
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2019 Events

Programme schedule for 6,7,8 September (PDF)

On one page (PDF)

Friday 6 September 2019

Venue: Oastler Building, University of Huddersfield (Map Link)

Friday is a mainly sedentary and verbal experience centred upon the Oastler Building venue, but interspersed with occasional forays into the surrounding townscape.

FRIDAY TICKETS: To sign up for Friday please register for general admission tickets on Eventbrite for Tickets for Friday 4WCOP

All events are free of charge. However, if you would like to make a donation you will be most welcome - you can support the congress on https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/4wcop or via Paypal

  • talk: Welcome Address
    10.45 Auditorium
    By: The Congress Organisers
    A Welcome to the Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography

    Note: The venue will be open from 10:15 AM

  • talk: The experiential landscape - the psychogeography of photography.
    11.00 Auditorium
    By: Rob Knight
    An interactive talk aiming to illuminate and explore the creative and reflective nature of psychogeography and how a creative artists may use it to inform and shape their work.
    The Experiential Landscape explores how many of our previous life experiences, skills, jobs, relationships and more affect and shape how we perceive the world around us and our place within. Using a psychogeographic mindset we can develop a reflective and creative knowledge of the places we inhabit and transition through. Asking questions of ourselves to understand our personal notions of space and place is a means to interact with and explore our environment. Rob uses the medium of photography, video, audio and written word to reflect on and tell the story of his own experiential landscape shaped by a psychogeographic mindset.
    The talk offers some very practical and real explorations of how psyhogeography shapes our interactive and perception of space and place to develop personal creative output. It asks the audience to reflect on and discuss some key questions to make it a two way presentation and collaborative creation of knowledge and experience.

    Note: Rob will be offering a Walkshop during Saturday’s programme in Dewsbury in which participants can put into practice some of the methods he will describe in the talk.

  • discussion: What is Psychogeography in 2019?
    11.00 Breakout Space
    By: Everyone
    Join this open discussion to find out what Psychogeography is, where it came from, how it has changed over the years, and what it means to be doing it in 2019. This is an informal discussion created and led by the participants so feel free to bring any material and examples to share (there's a computer and screen available) and any questions or talking

    Note: This session is in two parts of an hour each. The first session is chaired by Timmy Waters

  • Livestream: No Holiday
    12.00 Auditorium
    By: Patrick S. Ford
    This will be a live-stream broadcast of a walking performance which will take place in a chosen location within Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam, featuring Patrick’s ongoing journey, together with his red suitcase.
    So far there have been episodes of No Holiday both recorded and live-streamed from Ho Chi Minh City, Hong Kong, Venice (during the 2017 Biennale) and Yorkshire. The walk represents a Sisyphean journey to an intended holiday that is never reached. Patrick pulls his red suitcase, map, selfie-stick etc. and attempts to experience the time spent travelling to the destination.
    He explores the everyday experience of travelling overseas, burdened with a suitcase, interested in anything and everything that is encountered along the way. The approach is passive and meditative. The walk provokes questions such as Where is the intended end to the journey? Will the walk ever end? What is in the suitcase?

  • Performance: Psychogeography and the Trafford Centre
    12.30 Auditorium
    By: Fenella Brandenberg, David Bollinger and guests
    In the summer of 2019, several Northern wanderers went on a psychogeographical expedition into the Trafford Centre in Manchester. This session will be a performative piece with Fenella Brandenberg, David Bollinger and may feature other guest appearances!

  • Performance: Testing the Limits of Looking
    11.45 Outside
    By: Fiona Weir
    Join this workshop to explore how our ways of seeing are affected by imposed boundaries, limits and restrictions on moving around. Take part in an ‘action research’ experiment, then group discussion and display of our findings, including some reflections from Fiona, who began to lose her mobility in 2011

    Note: Max 25 participants, more details coming soon

  • Break: Lunch
    12.15 to 13.30 In and Out
    Lunch can be purchased at the International Kitchen restaurant or the Central Café, both in Student Central, or in the Town Centre.

    Note: The "Royal Society for the Preservation of Boring Grid Squares" will be running a stall to raise awareness of the dangers faced by the most featureless kilometre squares on OS maps.

  • Curated Session: The Alt-Antiquarian
    14.00 Auditorium
    By: Mark Valentine & John Billingsley
    Talk 1) Mark Valentine: A Country Still All Mystery – Occult Territory in Supernatural Fiction
    This talk will survey examples of how writers in the ‘occult’ field have depicted ‘sacred’ or ‘sinister’ landscape, and will explore whether this has affinities with the practice of psychogeography.
    W G Hoskins’ groundbreaking study The Making of the English Landscape (1955) explored how practical activities (agriculture, industry, etc) have shaped the land. But he was also alert to another sort of relationship, that of the numinous, marked not only by built shrines (churches, chapels) but also at natural places (springs, groves, stones). What has been left alone has a significance as well as what has been worked.
    This sense of ‘occult’ terrain is conveyed in a range of work in the supernatural or weird fiction field. Authors here evoke the uncanny both in remote country and in city streets. Arthur Machen’s ‘art of wandering’ and his alertness to strange experiences in the byways of London are already noted, but there are others whose work also portrays wanderers who encounter the weird: Mary Butts in Dorset and Cornwall; Elizabeth Bowen in the London of the Blitz; Walter de la Mare in several dream-like enclaves. The talk will also draw on insights in Amit Chaudhuri’s Clearing a Space (2008).

    TALK 2) John Billingsley: An Antiquarian Psychogeography
    This talk would introduce the relevance of phenomenology in visioning the past and monuments in relation to their landscape and place; reconsidering the role of folklore, particularly place legends, as the psychogeography of previous generations and the making of communal cognitive maps; acknowledging Coverley's inclusion of antiquarian investigators like Alfred Watkins in the broader psychogeographical canon, and the impact notions such as ley lines have had on contemporary appreciations of place; and ways in which a contemporary alt-antiquarian can intentionally project a mythopoetic enquiry on to mundane landscape.
    This is an area that has been a strand within wider psychogeography, as in, e.g., Sinclair and Ackroyd. It also challenges reductionist approaches of both scientistic and New Age perspectives. It is a useful antidote to the contemporary, urban and nowadays frequently artistic engagements with psychogeography in dissolving artificial separations between present and past.

  • Discussion: Definitions, Debates & Directions for Contemporary Psychogeography
    14.00 Breakout Space
    By: Taylor Butler-Eldridge, Alex Bridger, Simon Cole, Jamie McPhie and Tina Richardson.
    Psychogeography can no longer be confined by the narrow boundaries of definition following its radical Parisian roots. Taylor Butler-Eldridge aims to extend its transgressive trajectory by hosting a panel discussion surrounding further directions for contemporary psychogeography. The panel will include 4 of the leading scholars/practitioners within contemporary British psychogeography, to share their previous experience and vision for what psychogeography can be. There will be an opportunity to open the discussion further by inviting questions from the audience

  • Walk: Huddersfield Orbital
    14:00 Outside
    By: Tim Chapman
    This walk will be a condensed détournement of Iain Sinclair’s popular psychogeographic classic London Orbital, diagnosing the state of the nation on a circular walk of something under two miles around Huddersfield Ring Road.
    It will be a psychoeconomic exploration of the rise and fall of industrial civilisation. In the early 1960s, journalist James Morris looked down from Chapel Hill on a landscape of working mills, at the start of his book ‘The Road to Huddersfield: A Journey to Five Continents’. Commissioned by the World Bank, the book took Huddersfield as the epitome of industrialised society, an exemplar for the developing world to follow. Half a century later, Britain turns inwards. From the same point on Chapel Hill, we don’t take the road out into the world, but the circular ring road that carved out the town centre in the Harold Wilson era. The walk passes through Luddite insurrection, 19th century industrialisation and dissent, 20th century pride and decline, to examine the new landscape of student accommodation and 10-year masterplans. Cultural highlights include King Arthur, the Sex Pistols, Stockhausen, James Bond, Little Malcolm, and the secret portal to Viriconium.

    Note: Max 25 participants. Please register to attend this by getting tickets on Eventbrite for theHuddersfield Orbital Walk

  • Performance: Psychogeography is...an agile innovation for exploiting human
    15:30 Breakout Space
    By: PIRUDI: Centre for People-related Issues Research: Understanding and Influencing human behaviour
    Psychogeography is an agile, high-risk, high-reward science that needs to be exploited by Defence in our current national and international levels of severe Threat and insecurity. The cutting edge innovations of psychogeography offer world-leading opportunities for manipulation of information in the virtual and material domains to shape attitudes and beliefs in the cognitive domain and enhance the human capabilities of our People for sustained national Growth and prosperity. In this presentation, we will showcase the 7-year, £184 million research bid prepared by PIRUDI in response to The MOD’s Defence Science & Technology Lab’s Human and Social Sciences Research Capability call.

    Note: Due to current security levels, speaker(s) will present via an encrypted virtual link

  • Curated Session: The Psychogeography of Nuclear War and Peace
    16:15 Auditorium
    By: Becky Alexis-Martin & Wesley Perriman & Malcolm Craig, Moderated by Phil Wood
    Talk 1) Becky Alexis-Martin: Atomic Hol(e)y Spaces of Los Alamos
    A talk about feminist and auto-ethnographic processes surrounding psychogeographical exploration of nuclear places and spaces, with a focus on Los Alamos.
    Los Alamos rose from obscurity, a secret city called “Project Y”, nestled in the canyons of New Mexico. It was to become infamous as the home of the atomic bomb, the source of the science and technology that propelled and detonated atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the 6th and 9th August 1945. It is still a place of contradictions and secrets. It is a Plutopian idyll, presenting now as a pristine and beautiful town of white picket fences, surrounded by the dusty canyons of the New Mexican mesa. It makes a feature of its nuclear weapons laboratory. Tourist attractions include the Los Alamos visitor centre, LANL’s Bradbury Science Museum, Los Alamos Historical Museum, and Fuller Lodge Art Museum. These places retell the story of the atomic bomb, capitalising upon the culture of secrecy that surrounds nuclear weapons to rework the public-facing history of Los Alamos.
    Becky will focus on the Church of High Technology, the Black Hole and the Doomsday Stones, and their role in creating places of subversion and peace within the nuclear military industrial establishment by “un-worshiping the bomb”.

    Talk 2) Wesley Perriman: An Interpretation of the British Nuclear Weapons Tests and Their Legacy.
    Wesley will talk about his personal connection to Britain’s history of nuclear weapons testing – his father was a veteran. This will segue into the wider effects of the tests on their locations and the local populace. Finally Wesley will look at how our Nuclear heritage is being lost. Because the tests were conducted on the opposite side of the globe an 'out of sight, out of mind' mentality has developed.

    Talk 3) Malcolm Craig: Space and place in the history of nuclear proliferation
    This talk will examine the ways in which policymakers, the media, and creators of popular culture have imagined the links between the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the geographical environment. From the popularisation of imagined territories to interconnections between the commonplace and the unusual, the complexity and occasional strangeness of the nuclear world will be explored, with particular reference to locations in the UK and Pakistan.

  • Talk: Post-psychogeography, or a theory of unwalking
    16:15 Breakout Space
    By: Ivan Pope
    Can we have a psychogeography without walking?
    Ivan says Psychogeography has become an 'ambulatory behemoth', fixated on walking as a methodology when it should be a means of interrogating landscape to generate texts. He speculates if it is possible to undertake walking without going for a walk. He suggests separating ‘the walk’ from the physical action of walking, which he calls ‘unwalking’. He propose the notion of a protocol stack, taken from communications technology, to understand the constituent parts of the unwalking
    Ivan hopes that some of the counter-intuitive ideas he’s putting forward will shake up some fixed notions of what psychogeography can be by suggesting different substrates or modes of engaging with the landscape, different methods of recording, or disseminating, or choosing places.

  • Walk: Huddersfield "Art" Trail
    16.15 Outside
    By: Steve Goldman & Graeme Murrell
    Local residents will be aware of the Huddersfield “Art Wars” of the early 2000’s, during which control of the council was seized by the “Waste of Fookin Money” party. Its original aim of reducing the arts budget soon mutated into a populist ban on all spending on, and references to, public art. Consequently, many of the “pieces” commissioned by the council in the 60s-90s, although still in existence, have been largely left undocumented and forgotten. Join Steve and Graeme on a trail round the town centre to hopefully revive interest in some of these unappreciated “works”, such as Wyre & Padiham’s monumental “Aspects of Beige”, and Atkin Watendlath’s subtle yet surprising “Dog Hook”.

    Note: Max 25 participants. Please register to attend by getting tickets via the Eventbrite page for the Huddersfield "Art" Trail Walk

  • Film: Walking a Different Way
    16.45 Breakout Space
    By: Kate Morton
    What happens to our perception of the world around us if we are not moving through it on two feet but using a wheelchair? This short video presentation will challenge the assumptions of Psychogeography and give a new perspective on how our means of mobility affects our relationship to the environment.
    Kate says Psychogeography forgets there is a body that walks, and how that body walks affects how we perceive our environment. The traditional narrative of walking performance casts the walker as male, unencumbered and non-disabled. How would a different kind of body, with different expressions of mobility change the nature of a walking performance? The way we physically travel through the landscape affects what we notice about it and influences our emotional response. Landscape is shaped by the way we use it, navigate it and by the events that have happened there and at the same time. We are shaped by the landscape we move through. We relate events to places and memories are situated in particular locations.
    In relegating wheelchair use to a position other than walking, researchers, artists and psychogeographers are neglecting to discover the ways that different mobile practices might inform the whole debate about what walking is and what it means to walk. What if the rhythm of walking were different? How might that affect the rhythm of thought? Is it possible that the freedom to think comes not from the action of the feet, but from some other quality of human/landscape relationships?

  • Talk: Psychogeography is Runsploring. Exploring Marsden by Running.
    17.15 Breakout Space
    By: Laura Williams
    The countryside can be wild but traces of human existence can be found everywhere. Fences and walls, stiles and gates. Ruined farmhouses and dilapidated barns. Electric fences and litter. Laura will emphasise the rural landscape as an interesting site for psychogeography.
    Ever since she started running Laura has used it as the way of exploring new places. Put on your trainers, leave the house and just start running without any fixed idea of route. Build a map in your mind through piecing together the landscape by running. Runsploring - running plus exploring is a form of psychogeography.
    Laura will talk about her psychogeographic explorations of Marsden, sharing stories of running on the paths, tracks, trails and moors around the village and beyond. She will challenge us to question and reconsider the definitions of psychogeography for a rural context; and explore whether running, rather than walking, can be considered a form of psychogeographic practice.

  • Exhibition / Preview: Fieldworks: Dialogues in Psychogeography
    5.30 - 7.30pm Market Gallery, Queensgate Indoor Market
    By: Rob Lycett, Carl Meddings, Garry Clarkson, Tim Brown, Sam Welburn, Andy Conroy
    Join the artists for the preview show of an exhibition of psychogeography and a temporary contempary happening in this fantastic market space. View the Fieldworks Flyer

    Note: There might be refreshements provided 🍺. Show is also open on Saturday of the Congress from 11am to 4pm.

  • Break:
    18:00
    Food and drink available from various establishments around the Town Centre

    Note: Please make sure to visit the Fieldworks exhibition in Queensgate Market (see above) during this time.

  • Social: Social Event
    19.30 Northern Quarter
    By: Everyone
    Includes a screening of films by Alastair I Macdonald
    and
    Morag Rose’s ‘Loitering, Loving and Getting Lost’
    This performance combines fieldnotes from over a decade of artist-activist-academic praxis with a new and more personal psychogeography.
    In 2006 Morag co-founded The LRM (Loiterers Resistance Movement) a psychogeographical collective based in Manchester UK. Initially conceived as an experiment in taking radical political theory onto the streets, a key part of the work has been regular free, communal dérives, open to all who wish to wander and wonder on the First Sunday of every month. The LRMs manifesto states “We can’t agree on what psychogeography means” and we have a deep commitment to diversity, plurality and walking as an act of solidarity and defiance. At the heart of this is a the declaration that “ We believe there is magick in the mancunian rain. Our city is wonderful and made for more than shopping. The streets belong to everyone and we want to reclaim them for play and revolutionary fun...”
    Walking beyond The LRM into a more personal quest, this year Morag has begun tracing the footsteps of her ancestors. This quest draws links between Morag’s fragmented memories and wider socio-political issues of gender, disability, community and commemoration. Her walking has become not just an act of resistance but of remembrance and personal discovery.
    This work draws on, and expands, the extensive LRM archive, sharing highlights alongside new discoveries. It is a provocative performance blending – as all dérives do - poetry, politics and art, creating a work that is equal parts polemic, requiem and a manifesto for psychogeographic loitering.

    Note: @ Northern Quarter, 28 - 30 Wood St, Huddersfield HD1 1DU
    To sign up for these performances please register for tickets via Eventbrite at 4wcop Friday night social

Saturday 7th September 2019

Venue: Various locations around Dewsbury

Events will take place in or around BRIGANTIA in Dewsbury (fifth floor, Empire House, Wakefield Road, Dewsbury, WF12 8DJ Map Link)

All events are free of charge. However, if you would like to make a donation you will be most welcome - you can support the congress on https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/4wcop or via Paypal

Dependent upon weather conditions, some of the walks may pass over damp or difficult terrain, so please dress accordingly.

Participants are welcome to opt in and out at any point or to join us for the whole experience.

There is ample public transport to enable you to reach or depart from particular events.

If you are heading from Huddersfield by train we're recommending to take the 10:48 from Huddersfield (arrives 11:04). This is the stopping train which is a little slower, but will have the advantage of being relatively quiet and it starts from Huddersfield (Platform 6) so it should be relatively easy to get to it.

Programme

  • Talk: Introduction to The Day
    11.27 Brigantia 1
    By: Organisers
    An introduction to Saturday's World Congress.

    Note: Please note the precise start time of this starting event.

  • Talk: It's All a Game - A 4WCoP IF Adventure
    12.00 Brigantia 1
    By: Krishan Coupland
    How does the way in which we parse the world affect our experience of it? In this session we'll take a virtual dérive through five cities in five different formats ranging from Twine adventure to Dungeons & Dragons game. The only common element is that it's all, at the heart of it, play.
    This interactive audio/visual presentation is developed from an existing talk about interactive fiction. During the 45-minute session Krishan will present five different custom-made pieces of interactive fiction, each of which describes a short dérive in a different city. We'll play through each of them as a group, and then examine the way in which space and experience are parsed by each engine. Throughout he'll invite participants to see the world around them as an interactive environment, and project these ways of parsing the world onto the world they experience. This approach stems from the idea that psychogeography is, first and foremost, play - and that, thusly, a playful way of experiencing the world can be powerful in enhancing our ability to notice it.

    Note: Max 16 participants. Please register for tickets via Eventbrite for It's All a Game - A 4WCoP IF Adventure

  • Talk: Saving Psychogeography from the Academics
    12.00 Brigantia 2
    By: Adrian Riley
    Or...psychogeography as a practical tool for creative public engagement. This will be a combination of a visual talk plus some practical activity based on real-life examples from Adrian's collaborative practice using psychogeographic process and techniques for community engagement in public art and design commissions. The projects have involved artists, poets, scriptwriters, photographers and designers, walking, getting lost, meeting people, sharing stories and finding words with which to create public artworks to clearly defined briefs These include:
    * A building-wide poem on walls, fences, windows and pavements created from words collected on journeys around the locale.
    * Stories collected from the community and placed back where they took place.
    * An alternative series of ‘signposts’ encouraging navigation of a bird sanctuary via sound.
    * A seafront artwork of found words collated in the location, arranged according to tide patterns.
    * A former shop repurposed to stock the words of people of the town.

    Note: This session will begin outside Empire House for a simple activity in the locale and then move indoors to Brigantia 2 for the talk and an activity creating a new text on the fly.

  • Walkshop: The experiential landscape - the psychogeography of photography.
    12.00 Outside
    By: Rob Knight
    Rob will lead a walk to explore the creative experience of the derive or drift. It will allow participants to explore for themselves, documenting and creating imagery, video and audio artefacts inspired by the creative walk.
    The walkshop is designed to offer a toolkit as to how we might explore and react to place through a psychogeographic and creative mindset giving participants an ability to use some everyday tech or tools to frame their own personal reflections and meanderings. It will show how Rob uses a psychogeographic mindset to shape and inspire his creative output as a professional artist / photographer and educator.

    Note: Whilst it would be advisable for people attending the Walkshop to have already heard Rob’s Talk in Friday’s programme in Huddersfield, it is not essential.
    Max 25 participants. Please register via Eventbrite to book your tickets for The experiential landscape

  • Talk: Expanding perceptions with sensors
    12.45 Brigantia 1
    By: David Upton
    We are unable to sense many subtle signals: for example only our smartphones know that GPS satellite signals are always above us. What other energies and indicators does our conscious perception miss, which nevertheless influence our lives, emotions and attitudes?
    David has begun to build a portable sensor kit, to expand his perceptions during and after psychogeographic walks, with a particular focus on magnetic fields and radio waves. He would like to share the technology and the results he is obtaining. He wants to try to make these forces more visible, either by maps or art works, or by 'real time' Augmented Reality displays for walkers. It raises some interesting questions: Can things that we do not consciously sense nevertheless affect our perceptions? Could it one day show an objective basis for apparently 'occult' phenomena like ley lines and dowsing?
    These technologies are increasingly easy to replicate, and to some extent already exist in the mobile phones that we all carry around with us. David hopes to show people ways to use their phones to expand their conscious awareness.

  • Break: Lunch
    13.30
    By: Everyone

  • Talk: Web Walking
    14.30 Brigantia 1
    By: Helen Billinghurst & Phil Smith
    A presentation in response to growing and divisive crises, Helen and Phil propose a new emphasis for psychogeography: a walk towards conviviality, togetherness, connectivity and group world building. They want to advocate a practical ecological and convivial re-wilding of themselves and a renewal as artists in a metaphorical dark forest of imagination.
    Web Walking is a response to the growing and divisive crises of populism, misinformation, misogyny, fundamentalist reaction and species extinction, as they propose a new emphasis for psychogeography. They advocate for a practice that is not based on the thrill of apocalypse; they want to get away from the individualist consumerist thrills of the psychogeographical ‘eerie’ as entertainment product – and repurpose the challenge of climate change and the affects of the dread space of hypermodernity as means to conviviality and connectivity (web walking).
    Mindful of psychogeography’s problematic ‘occult’ tradition, they will propose a non-systems based strategy for walking in the ‘magical mode’ (as defined by Gilbert Simondon), drawing on the fictioning and myth-science of Simon O’Sullivan, Hélène Cixous’s embrace of mutant social relations and our own discoveries in the world. They will point to the ideology of separateness – the huge revenant of neo-liberalism, even more resilient and confounding now that neo-liberalism is dying and leaving behind its spectres and holograms – as psychogeography’s primary foe. Against individualism and isolation, they offer arachnian weaving paths inspired by Fernand Deligny; and will describe some practical examples.

  • Talk: Psychogeography And Grief: Navigating Loss Of Body And Place
    14.30 Brigantia 2
    By: Cynthia A. Schemmer
    Following the death of her mother in 2006, Cynthia acquired an insatiable need to see the unseeable of New York City, the place she and her mother once called home. She obsessively explored the ruins: Dead Horse Bay, Domino Sugar Factory, Arthur Kill ship graveyard, the Brooklyn corner where the apartment her mother was born into once stood, and more. She wanted to collect the histories of her mother and her version of New York, staggered between this world and another, and what those histories look like today. She wanted to learn about the past without the influence of capitalism, in places that exist outside of museums and crowds.
    In this workshop, Cythia will discuss her book-in-progress and then lead the audience in a creative writing workshop that explores grief of body and place, the changes that are constantly occurring within both, and the role of psychogeography. There has yet to be any formal literature regarding the connections between psychogeography and grief. While her book is not yet finished, Cynthia believes it will be the first to merge the two, and her hope is to expand the community's perception of psychogeography by working through their own grief of body and place.

  • Walk: Act of Resistance
    14.30 Outside
    By: Andrew Howe
    Actively challenging control of space and place is an important part of psychogeography. In this event, participants will make small interventions in the urban landscape to foster community kindness, before gathering for a short performance walk as a demonstration of unity.
    The event will commence with a brief introduction to the history of people’s protests in West Yorkshire, with reference to specific local places and movements such as Chartism and Luddism. Andrew will set participants a simple task to complete and this will be followed by a silent collective act in public space.
    The small interventions will encourage participants to look closely at, and engage with, the streetscape with a specific purpose in mind. The results are also intended to engage non-participating members of the public by encouraging curiosity, raising awareness of an urgent need for more community spirit. The closing group activity will involve all participants in a simple performance that draws on Fluxus events and performance projects such as Open City. It offers an opportunity to take part in a creative action, transforming albeit briefly and subtly, a public space, whilst drawing attention to the important role that walking has in demonstrating collective solidarity, identity and belonging.

    Note: Max 20 participants. Please register for tickets for this event on Eventbrite for Act of Resistance

  • Talk: Psychogeographic Flow and Writing the Black Country
    15.15 Brigantia 1
    By: Kerry Hadley-Pryce
    How might psychogeographic walking in a 'liminal' area like the Black Country in the West Midlands ignite a feeling of 'flow' and inspire new pieces of creative writing?
    According to some, the Black Country is a 'place' somewhere in the West Midlands. As others have noted, however, the precise pinning down of where the Black Country borders are located has been, and remains, a contentious issue. It tends to be regarded as a liminal place, not quite town, not quite rural, yet containing both, and it is a ‘place’ that has dialects, traditions and a culture, which includes its literature/writing output. Indeed, an important thematic thread of writing that comes out of the Black Country is ‘place’ or, more specifically a sense of place.
    Those who live there have a form of topophilia without even realising it. By focusing on this notably ‘unmappable’ place (the Black Country), this talk makes psychogeography account for itself, taking it off the beaten track, drifting into an analysis of how writers deal with the region as a ‘sensation of place’ in their writing. It will tackle ideas about deep topography and, will develop the concept of psychogeography much further, connected to Kent Chapin Ross' and Katarina Loffler's separate notions of literary psychogeography, and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s ‘Flow’ in creativity.
    It may also open up interesting comparisons between the Black Country and the liminal Heavy Woollen District which surrounds Dewsbury

  • Walk: Walking Weirdly
    15.15 Outside
    By: Fiona Weir
    The first rule is, the rules are all yours! Walking Weirdly is a new game for exploring the places you find yourself in and experiencing them differently. Play alone or with two, three or four people, or in teams. Pick cards at random, deal them out, and compete, or share every challenge. Give points or don’t. Aim for laughter, reflection, new experiences and awareness. (Conceived and designed by Fiona Weir. Sets available to borrow or to buy from Fiona).

    Note: Max 25 participants. Please register for tickets for this event on Eventbrite for Walking Weirdly

  • Break: Break
    15.45
    By: Everyone

  • Performance: What does Psychogeography feel like?
    16.00 Brigantia 1
    By: Threadbear Theatre
    So 4WCoP’s talking about what psychogeography is, but what does it feel like? And is what it feels like what it actually is? Isn't that more 'it' than anything else? This is a chance to share your thoughts, bright moments and stories about psychogeography, see them played back by a skilled team of improvisers and follow the red thread that connects all our stories.
    Threadbear Theatre invites the audience to share thoughts stories and moments in a playback theatre performance. Playback theatre explores the feelings, emotions, atmospheres and archetypes inside and around our experiences, great or small. People's thoughts and stories and the performers’ response to them seed other stories and a thread develops connecting everyone's stories.

  • Films: A screening of various films
    16.00 Brigantia 2
    By: Various Artists
    A screening of various films, including the work of Alastair I Macdonald, https://alistairimacdonald.com/

    Note: A second chance to see the films first screened on Friday night

  • Break: Close
    17.15
    By: Everyone
    Walk to Dewsbury Railway Station and travel by train to Huddersfield NOTE: there are trains at 17.29, 17.51 and 18.10 and the journey takes between 9 and 18 minutes.

  • Intervention: Fun & Games
    18.45 St. Georges Sq.
    By: Crab & Bee
    A presentation in response to growing and divisive crises, we propose a new emphasis for psychogeography: a walk towards conviviality, togetherness, connectivity and group world building. We want to advocate a practical ecological and convivial re-wilding of ourselves and a renewal of ourselves as artists in a metaphorical dark forest of imagination.

    Note: Meet at the statue of Harold Wilson outside the railway station

  • Social: Social Event
    19.30 Small Seeds, Castlegate, Huddersfield HD1 2UD
    By: Everyone
    New Weird Huddersfield presents:
    an evening of psychogeographical entertainment.
    * Comic artist and musician Malcy Duff performs a live comic;
    * Kneeling Coats make music from map-scores, land use and psych-interpretation;
    * Napoleon III performs BUILDINGS , a new piece of music, light and performance, which derives from his vision of composition and sound as structural or architectural; and explores the impact of the city on both individual and group happiness.
    * Kevin Boniface reads from his books The Most Difficult Thing Ever and Round About Town, with audio visual accompaniment.

    Price: £5 on the door or pay what you can afford. Nobody will be refused entry.

    Note: Malcy Duff will also lead a workshop on Sunday at the Making Space in Huddersfield. (Doors for Small Seeds open at 7.30pm)

Sunday 8th September 2019

Venue: Various locations around Marsden

Events will take place in or around MARSDEN PAROCHIAL HALL, Clough Lea, Marsden, Huddersfield HD7 6DN (map link)

All events are free of charge. However, if you would like to make a donation you will be most welcome - you can support the congress on https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/4wcop or via Paypal

Dependent upon weather conditions, some of the walks may pass over damp or difficult terrain, so please dress accordingly.

Participants are welcome to opt in and out at any point or to join us for the whole experience.

There is ample public transport to enable you to reach or depart from particular events.

Programme

  • Swim: Unsynchronised Swimming/With Swimming In Mind - an outdoor swimming exploration
    10.15 Sparth Reservoir
    By: Amy Walker and Fiona Weir
    Does water connect mind, body and place in a unique way? This outdoor swim is a chance to find out! Sparth Reservoir has been used for organised and disorganised swimming for generations, and is a unique, liminal, watery place between canal, lock, road, railway, woodland and moorland. Explore the water, landscape and yourself.
    Important: Participants swim at their own risk: to take part, you MUST be a confident swimmer and must read The Outdoor Swimming Society's 'safer swimming' advice. Please note there are no changing facilities: we dress/undress in public beside the water, so bring a big towel or similar as well as your swimming costume.

    Note: Only 12 places available; Please regsiter for your place via eventbrite: tickets for Unsynchronised Swimming/With Swimming In Mind

  • Talk/Walk: Foregrounding the psychology in psycho/geography
    12.00 Marsden Paraochial Hall
    By: Andrea Capstick
    The psychological dimension of psychogeography has been somewhat overlooked. More attention has been paid to the geographical dimension of psychogeography than to its basis in psychology. Psychology is also a multiple and contested field. So what kind of psychology might work if we want to enrich and expand psychogeography as concept and practice?
    The Situationists spoke of the impact of the geographical environment on the 'emotions and behaviour', but psychology is much more than this, taking in, for example, cognition, memory, dreams, imagination, and what has sometimes been described as 'unconscious mental life'.
    This session will involve going for a short unstructured walk, whilst paying close attention to the impact of the environment in question on each participants' 'inner state'. Participants will be asked to make a one page record of the walk, using words and phrases, drawings, free association, found images and objects etc. Post-walk discussion will focus specifically on the phenomenon of selection, ie why do we choose certain objects, images, words rather than others in order to describe or explain a landscape to ourselves? Is it simply there to be found, do we create it imaginatively, or are certain elements always, already foregrounded due to past associations that we may not be aware of?

    Note: Max 12 participants. Please register for tickets for this event on Eventbrite for Foregrounding the psychology in psycho/geography.

  • Walk: Marsden by accident
    12.00 Outside
    By: Chris Marsden
    A three mile walk across Marsden guided by Chris Marsden to visit sites of accidents to people called Marsden. The walk links up eight sites of Nineteenth Century accidents to people called Marsden with a short account of each.

    Note: Space is limited. Please register to attend this event via the Eventbrite page for Marsden By Accident. Please register Stout footwear and outdoor wear are recommended as the walk includes exposed rough ground. To save a long up-hill walk it includes a mid-walk £1.50 bus ride to Owlers Farm.

  • Walk/Performance: Poetics of Space/Place
    14.45 Marsden Paraochial Hall
    By: Rob Lycett
    Building upon his practice of responding to spaces and experiences, Rob will lead a writing/performance activity which uses location specific language as a framework. Each participant will wander through Marsden gathering language using the ‘what three words’ app (iOS Android), a system which provides language coordinates based upon three random words. The work will culminate in performances of the short poetic works in various locations in Marsden as language based interventions.

  • Walk: Draw It Out - an outdoor exploration with Kate Morton and Fiona Weir
    14.45 Outside
    By: Fiona Weir
    What happens when we pay deliberate attention to the effects and emotions created in us by a landscape? Join this semi-structured group game to explore, draw maps and find out. A unique corner of Marsden has been deliberately chosen for its geographic and psychogeographic variety: within half a mile, we find roads, housing, railway, canal, river, nature garden, woods, undergrowth and art.

    Note: Note that all participants - whether on wheels or on foot - will be able to access some but not all paths. The main path is level but uneven and some wheelchair users may wish to come with a helper; contact Kate/Fiona if you would like to discuss.

  • Walk: Get Yourself in a State...
    16.00 Outside
    By: Simon Cole
    Get Yourself in a State...of receptivity, where anything and everything is of interest. Ever experienced a flow state in the park, or sunk into mystic reveries on the bus? Then you are one of us - and we need you for this creative, collaborative and playful walk.
    Psychogeography is a state of mind: a way of going about in a world that's suddenly so much more interesting when you activate this mindset, using tools we already have inside our own heads. Simon Cole didn't realise he'd been doing Psychogeography for decades all over the world until recently. And he never knew so many other people were doing it too, until #4WCOP. So with some references to the 'original Psychogeographer' William Blake, some readings and some practical exercises, we're going to collectively change our state. We're going to bounce off each other and create a small space of possibility. This will not be a lecture: it's going to be collaborative, consensual and creative. Using the technique of the Dérive and a few other state-changing techniques, we'll go on foot for a short 'wonder wander' of possibility.

    Note: Max 20 participants. Please register for tickets for this event on Eventbrite for Get Yourself in a State

  • Talk: TBC
    16.00 Marsden Paraochial Hall
    By:
    Possible talk here, watch this space

  • Social: Closing Event
    17.00 Riverhead Brewery Tap
    By: Everyone
    Refreshments at the Riverhead Brewery Tap, 2 Peel St, Marsden, Huddersfield HD7 6BR

Who Took Part in 2019?

Fiona Weir

Fiona is an artist, freelance researcher and strategist, interested in the ideas and relationships that lead to social change. After 30 years working hard in the university and public sectors, she is spending a year playing and making art, while finding out how new disability affects her ways of looking and being in the world. She is the creator of Walking Weirdly, new outdoor games for psychogeographic exploration.
Rob Knight
Rob Knight is a professional photographer, educator, mentor, curator and speaker from Sheffield. His work explores deep personal connections and perceptions to and of space / place as a means to create. Rob has worked in higher education for over 11 years and been a professional photographer for around 15 years.
Patrick S. Ford
Patrick Ford is an artist living and working in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and currently employed an associate lecturer at RMIT University Saigon. View Patrick's Website, Blog YouTube
Fenella Brandenberg, David Bollinger and guests
Bollinger and Brandenberg are world leading psychogeographers. They didn't send in a detailed biography but the curious are encouraged to watch for further information which will be revealed on these guest blogs: http://particulations.blogspot.co.uk and https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com
Alex J Bridger
Psychogeographer and senior lecturer in critical psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Currently writing a book about psychogeography and psychology which is due to be published in 2019. Co-organiser of the 4th World Congress of Psychogeography and the Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network. https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com/
David Upton
Studying for an MA in Computational Art at Goldsmiths College, London. He attended last two 4WCOPs and led an 'anti-rush hour' derive at the last one, otherwise he's normal. Founded 'Strand Strollers' psychogeography group.
Mark Valentine
Mark Valentine is the author of studies of Arthur Machen (Seren, 1995) and the diplomat and fantasist ‘Sarban’ (Tartarus, 2010), and has written widely on supernatural fiction. He is the editor of Wormwood, a journal of the fantastic in literature, now in its sixteenth year. Valentine is also a veteran of the earth mysteries field and edited Source, a journal of holy wells. His own supernatural stories have appeared in numerous collections and anthologies, most recently in The Uncertainty of All Earthly Things (2018) and Inner Europe, a shared volume with John Howard (also 2018).
John Billingsley
John Billingsley has edited the world’s longest-running neo-antiquarian journal, Northern Earth, since 1992, covering customary themes like archaeology and folklore along with broader approaches to landscape and place, including phenomenology and psychogeography. He has also written and edited several books on folk tales, magical house protection, and local history.
Taylor Butler-Eldridge
Taylor Butler-Eldridge is a soon to be postgraduate student at the University of Exeter with an active interest in critical psychogeography as an educational and social research approach. Recent Project: ‘Mad Meanders and Chaotic Cartography: A Place for Psychogeography within Outdoor Education’ (Undergraduate Dissertation at the University of Cumbria).
Phil Wood
Phil Wood is the Urban Therapist, an intercultural path-beater scavenging the discarded edgelands of our settlements and memories; confronting us with our hubristic follies and rekindling our capacity for compassion and community. He works and walks all over the world but has never really left Huddersfield.  http://subversiveurbanism.tumblr.com
Tina Richardson
Tina Richardson specialises in the field of urban cultural studies. Having received her PhD at the University of Leeds in 2014 she is now a lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University. Tina’s latest edited volume has been published by Rowman and Littlefield International : Walking Inside Out - Contemporary British Psychogeography (2015). From a cultural theory and psychogeography background, Tina specialises in - identity and place, the application of poststructural theory to space, and the appearance of urban space under neoliberalism. Schizocartography Website,Blog. Twitter : @concretepost
Steve Goldman
Steve Goldman has spent the last ten years on a series of bizarre wanderings and other travel and map related activities. He only recently came across the term 'Psychogeography', which pleased him no end because he now finally has an answer to the question 'What the fuck are you doing?'. The result of some of his endeavours are collected on mapfodder.com.
Graeme Murrell
Graeme Murrell is an artist based in Huddersfield. His interest is mostly connected to experimental multimedia works involving text, sound and performance. Since the 1990s, he has been involved with several publication projects such as Frontal Lobe, a small press magazine of poetry, scurrilous writing and other rants and Electric Dogs, an unpublished novel. He has also been the member of avant-jazz band Trump and later the freeform music group the 'F*ks and the duo The Importance Of...' He is the editor of the website Monocular Times which curates Situationist writing and other writing and hosts the site of pressure group Huddersfield Gem who are dedicated to the preservation of Huddersfield’s Queensgate Market. He is the member of the Sedentary Committee for the Consideration of Gradual Change and continues to curate the Institute for the Preservation of Bad Art, which is dedicated to saving poorly executed artworks from landfill. He devised and led ‘Over Here Over There’ which was a psychogeographical exploration of the territory between twin towns in West Yorkshire and the Ruhr Valley.
Jamie McPhie
Jamie McPhie is the course leader for the MA Outdoor and Experiential Learning degree, having previously been lecturer for cultural landscapes and aesthetics in the outdoors here at the University of Cumbria.
Tim Chapman
Tim Chapman is a writer and photographer. Work includes “Haunts of the Halifax Slasher” (Strange Attractor Journal, 2005); 'When in doubt, quote Ballard': An interview with Iain Sinclair' (Ballardian.com, 2006); and “Blue Shift” (2017), a novel about cosmology and dancing.
Becky Alexis-Martin
Becky Alexis-Martin is a lecturer in cultural geography at Manchester Metropolitan University, with expertise in nuclear warfare. She writes on the lives of nuclear test veteran families, and the cultural and social significance of nuclear places and spaces. Her work is feminist and radical in nature, and seeks to provide insights and explorations of hidden spaces.
Wesley Perriman
Wesley Perriman, Nuclear Curator. Exhibiting ephemera related to British Nuclear Testing.
Malcolm Craig
Malcolm Craig is Senior Lecturer in American History at Liverpool John Moores University. His main research interests lie in the fields of US and UK foreign policy in the post-1945 period, with a particular focus on national security, nuclear weapons, and secret intelligence. He has had work published on the global arms trade, nuclear non-proliferation, Western interactions with the 'Islamic world', and domestic British intelligence issues.
Ivan Pope
Ivan Pope is an artist and writer who has worked with technology and navigation systems since the early days of the internet. He was also an early internet entrepreneur, invented the Cybercafe and published the world's first web magazine. He is currently undertaking a research degree at Plymouth University.
Kate Morton
Kate Morton is a scenographer with a particular interest in mobile, site-specific performance. Her work is concerned with human/non-human interactions, from the way that we use objects to how we perceive the landscape. She has just completed a Masters in Performance Design at University of Leeds.
Laura Williams
I am a librarian, an avid reader, a fell and trail runner, a people watcher and someone who loves adventures to discover new places. My interest in psychogeography first began whilst studying for a degree in theatre and performance studies. I learnt the word whilst writing my dissertation and the concept of psychogeography has intrigued me ever since.
Morag Rose
Morag has developed a unique artistic-activist-academic praxis. She co-founded The LRM (Loiterers Resistance Movement) a psychogeographical collective based in Manchester, UK. Their manifesto says they believe 'our city is wonderful and made for more than shopping. The streets belong to everyone and we want to reclaim them for play and revolutionary fun.' In 2016 The LRM celebrated their tenth birthday with a 3 month extravaganza at Peoples History Museum which included work from over 50 international artists. Morag’s PhD research focused on psychogeographies, geA designer/artist who works across the northnder and public space and her mission has always been to create a psychogeography that is accessible, diverse and critically engaging. Has it all been a waste of time and space or can the drift lead us towards spatial and social justice? She now lectures in the department of Geography and Planning at the University of Liverpool.
Krishan Coupland
Krishan Coupland is a graduate from the University of East Anglia MA Creative Writing programme. His debut chapbook When You Lived Inside The Walls is available from Stonewood Press, and his short fiction appears in Ambit, Aesthetica and Litro. He is unduly pre-occupied with theme parks. krishancoupland.co.uk
Adrian Riley
A designer/artist who works across the north of England
Helen Billinghurst & Phil Smith
We are a collaboration, Crab & Bee; our main focus is to explore and reveal the secrets of everyday spaces through artworks, publications, readings, scryings and performances. To address spaces of exclusion, amnesia, crisis and marginalisation by creating art works, exhibitions, texts, painted poems, performances, walks, maps and guides that facilitate others (particularly those excluded) to connect to their terrains. As individuals we have 30 years combined experience of creating site-specific walking-based artworks, handbooks, readings, exhibitions, t shirts, and performances.
Oliver East
I apply expanded forms of illustration within an architectural framework to create dynamic place from neglected space. My practice manifests itself as reportage illustration, comics and temporary public sculpture.
Andrew Howe
Andrew Howe is an artist, working solo and in collaboration with other practitioners and community groups. He uses walking and mapping to explore how people interact with places, informed by experience of over 30 years in engineering/environmental consultancy. He is a founding member of the Cinderloo1821 community organisation delivering a Heritage Lottery funded project to reveal hidden narratives and raise awareness of the Cinderloo Uprising, an industrial protest that took place almost 200 years ago in Dawley, now part of Telford. www.andrew-howe.com
Kerry Hadley-Pryce
Kerry Hadley-Pryce is a writer from the Black Country in the West Midlands. Her two novels: 'The Black Country' (published by Salt Publishing, 2015) and 'Gamble' (published by Salt Publishing, 2018) are imbued with a sensation place. Her short stories have been published by Fictive Dream and The Incubator, and have been dramatised on Brum Radio. She is a PhD candidate, studying Psychogeographic Flow and Black Country Writing, and is in the midst of writing her third novel. She has just accepted the position of Editor of The Black Country Society's magazine, 'The Blackcountryman.'
Threadbear Theatre
Threadbear Theatre are a skilled group of improvisers based in West Yorkshire. We offer performances and workshops in Playback Theatre and improvisation and welcome new attendees at our occasional open rehearsals. Improvisation is about accepting offers. We are always interested in offers!
Andrea Capstick
Andrea Capstick is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Bradford, who has used walking interviews as a data collection method in her research on dementia. She has taught Psychology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and has a particular interest in participatory visual methods (film/photography) and place memory.
Chris Marsden
Flâneur, reader and writer not from Marsden.
Rob Lycett
Rob Lycett’s research practice considers poetic ‘stillness’ performed within various analogue and digital media, taking the form of films, books, designs, drawings, writings, digital installations and live performances. Rob teaches on the BA (Hons) Graphic Design and Animation courses at the University of Huddersfield.
Simon Cole
Writer, tour guide and occasional performer Simon Cole has been sniffing out the urban cracks and fissures of Europe for decades, before he even realised he was a Psychogeographer. Founder of the alternative Hackney Tours, he's fascinated by ideas and always deconstructing and rebuilding the world around him. Sous les pavés...?
Cynthia A. Schemmer
Cynthia Ann Schemmer is a writer, editor, book devourer, and musician. Originally from New York, she currently lives in Philadelphia where she works at the Free Library. She is also a freelance writer and works remotely as the managing editor of She Shreds Magazine. She has been published in The Score for Lincoln Center, Mask Magazine, Philadelphia City Paper, Impose, Underwater New York, The Media, Broken Pencil, Toska Magazine, Connotation Press, RE/VISIONIST, and Elevate Difference, among others. She has also co-authored a chapter in Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind, a collection of tips and narratives on ways non-parents can support parents and children (PM Press, 2012), and is a contributor to Stompbox: A Visual Exploration of the Guitar Pedal, to be released by Penguin Random House’s Ten Speed Press in 2020. In the past, she wrote Secret Bully, a creative nonfiction zine of personal essays, as well as Habits of Being, an oral history zine about SuBAMUH, She has a BA in Journalism from SUNY Purchase and an MFA in creative writing from Sarah Lawrence College, and is working on a book about psychogeography and grief. https://www.cynthiaschemmer.com
s

2018 Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography Sept

Blog Coverage

Read Andrew Howe's report on the 2018 Congress: https://andhowenow.wordpress.com/2018/09/14/fourth-world-congress-of-psychogeography/

Victoria Karlsson has written a write up about the congress including details about her work http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/pgcommunity/2018/10/05/sonic-margins-at-the-4th-world-congress-of-psychogeography-in-huddersfield/

Elspeth (Billie) Penfold writes about her and Sonia Overall's event at the Congress http://elspethpenfold.blogspot.com/2018/09/weaving-walk-fourth-world-congress-of.html

2018 Events

Programme schedule for 7-8 September (PDF)

Friday 7th September 2018

Venue: Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield

Friday is a mainly sedentary and verbal experience centred upon Heritage Quay, but interspersed with occasional forays into the surrounding townscape.

All events are free of charge. However, if you would like to make a donation you will be most welcome. Look out for the Blue Buckets.

  • talk: Welcome Address
    10.30 Auditorium
    By: The Congress Organisers
    A Welcome to the Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography

    Note: The venue will be open from 10:00 AM

  • Forum: Identities
    10.45 Auditorium
    By: Alex Bridger, Anna Davidson and Lesley Wood

    Alex J Bridger : Walking In Between The Margins: A Psychogeographical Study with LGBT people in The Kirklees Area. This talk will outline psychogeography as a way to document LGBT people’s experiences living in the Kirklees area. It extends psychogeographical work to not only consider consumer capitalism but to conceptualise a gender informed approach to doing psychogeography. Bridger undertook various walks with local people from across the LGBT spectrum, in order to explore memories, create art pieces to represent experiences of the area and to document ‘queerness’ in places. His team conducted psychogeographical walks in Huddersfield, Batley, Holmfirth and Manchester. Participants took photographs, drew DIY maps and wrote reflective accounts of the walks. The team is in the process of threading key themes from the photographs, audio and written accounts by the participants. They believe further psychogeographical work is needed to work with LGBT people to consider their standpoints in relation to consumer capitalism as well as to develop a feminist, queer and LGBT informed approach to psychogeographical research and practice.

    Anna Davidson : Diverse/Derives. There is something about anagrams. Maybe it’s the opportunity to diverge from a word’s linear reading and to derive other meanings from the constituent parts. For the Situationist International, the détournement – taking capitalist cultural imageries and symbols and rerouting or hijacking them – was a mode of resistance against the alienation wrought by capitalism through culture. This short video-presentation asks what might happen if the psychogeographic walk is diverted into its own Vague Terrains? What haunted, queer, feminist, invisible, nonhuman, othered subjectivities, ways of moving and knowing are situated on the margins of the dérive itself? What stories emerge of the Colne valley from Marsden to Huddersfield when you decentre the singular, present, coherent, human walking subject as story-teller?

    Lesley Wood : Exploring Hinterland. In May 2016 Wood walked solo from Leeds to Newcastle, traversing personal hinterland between present and past home cities, exploring themes of connection, separation, loss and change. The walk was an inquiry into how women inhabit space (perhaps public space is more often than not 'vague terrain' for women) and the dynamic interaction between a human subject and a beloved landscape, emotionally, politically and aesthetically. She walked a 'matri-line' linking four generations and four female members of family (the latest in a long line of 'Eleanors'). Hence, her walk was an exercise in feminist psychogeography, investigating how her gender, as well as her age (60-plus) and impairment (arthritic hip), framed her experience. It provoked an exploration of the concept of hinterland- defined variously as: ‘behind the land’ (from the German); or, the area from which resources are drawn; or, the area beyond what is visible or known- as a metaphor for women’s beleaguered subjectivity. In that respect she experienced the line travelled as the ground on which she stands, the space where she discovered who she is. This personal aspect was linked to consideration of the lives of other women, both past and present, and with stories of human impact embedded in the landscape.

    Note: Short presentations followed by an open panel discussion

  • Discussion: What is Psychogeography in 2018?
    10.45 Breakout Space
    By: Everyone
    Join this open discussion in the breakout space to find out what Psychogeography is, where it came from, how it has changed over the years, and what it means to be doing it in 2018. This is an informal discussion created and led by the participants so feel free to bring any material and examples to share (there's a computer and screen available) and any questions or talking points you'd like to discuss.

  • Break: LUNCH
    12.15 - 13.30 Inside and Out
    Lunch can be purchased at the International Kitchen restaurant or the Central Café, both in Student Central, or in the Town Centre. (With the exception of those participating in the Retail Environments session, for which special provision is made). Also see the list of places to eat in Queensgate Market (PDF). also in the market you can see the Temporary Contemporary Exhibition with the art work of Ryan Durrant (Black Bag)

  • Walk & Talk: Retail Environments as Vague Terrain
    12.15 Outdoors followed by Break-out Room
    By: Andrew Taylor, Katrina Whitehead, & Kasia Breska

    Andrew Taylor & Katrina Whitehead : Empty Shop Project 4.0: Re-Viewing Post-Industrial Consumer Culture. Empty spaces pervade our once rich and vibrant retail centres, increasingly marginalised businesses shut-up shop and uninspired consumers wander the town centre of Huddersfield disconnected from their culture as consumers and community. How our surroundings affect us is embodied and embedded in patterns of everyday experiences;“… the breathtakingly brilliant aesthetics of Apple’s spit and polished flagship store in the Big Apple or, conversely, the intuitive sense that a shopping centre is on the slide as discounters occupy space formerly reserved for consumer-captivating, upscale-oriented anchor tenants.” (Brown, 2016). Andrew Taylor and Katrina Whitehead are ecologically re-mapping the post-industrial consumer culture in and around the town centre of Huddersfield. Drawing on inspiration from their walks, they curate a shared vision of how town centres can be experienced through shared data, documents and community involvement. Re-viewing the subtle spatial codes and signals that surround us, we ask how we can re-connect the liminal retail spaces with the townspeople to collectively discover a way to create a new and novel vision to a place. Can our collective ideas make a difference to how we map space, notice and experience spaces and regenerate our retail social spaces?

    Kasia Breska : Murals As A Site Specific Intervention – Translating Qualities of Space Into Colours And Symbols. Kasia Breska works as a muralist and her work is deeply rooted in a site specific research of a place, linking many different dimensions, from the history to architectural and geographical qualities, to cultural and visual aspects. Coming from the background of environmental studies and then fine art, Breska joins both, concepts of habitat and visual language. In her work, she researches the site she paints as a habitat, an environment, where all elements of that space constitute a certain set of dynamics, perceptions, then eventually feelings and behaviours. For Breska, murals are powerful elements changing those dynamics and perceptions and working as an artist gives an incredible chance (and huge responsibility) to influence, shape the space. She works with an idea of developing systems of codes and shapes that create an alphabet, language of the space/location. The second element influencing her creative process is colour, vast quantities of flat, block colours, applied in carefully thought over combinations, joining the compositions of shapes and symbols. All designs Breska executes are there to build connection between the space and its inhabitants, to influence space’s qualities, to create a ‘good habitat’ for those who live/stay there.

    Note: Participants will walk from Heritage Quay to Queensgate Market, where lunch can be purchased at various outlets. There will be seating and tables reserved in the ‘Events Area’ of the Queensgate Market where all 4wcop attendees can sit and have a bite to eat and something to drink. Also in the Events Space will be exhibited work by local artist, Kasia Brescia. A walk around the Market will take in the Temporary Contemporary art show, before returning to Heritage Quay for presentations and discussion.
    The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. For free tickets, register here tickets for walk to Queensgate Market (via TicketSource)

  • walk: Lunch break dérive: short personal heritage walks
    13.00 & 13.15 Outside
    By: Graeme Murrell
    This idea is a response both to Phil Smith's appeal for inclusive derives which are accessible to those who may find it difficult to take part in the long meanderings characteristic of most flaneur activity, and to the request for activities which subvert the concept of heritage. This will be a short 15 minute derive involving no more than 15 participants. It will follow a zigzag route away from the source followed by a direct return to the source. Each day's derive will begin at a different source. At each point where the derive changes course, a participant will be asked to share something short (a historical or architectural reference, random thought, sweets, personal reminiscence or something else in response to the space we find ourselves in). The heritage exposed will therefore be shared and directionless, an overlapping narrative determined by the personal experiences and desires of the participants. Unlike a guided walk the narrative is most likely to be fractured and unexpected, and is unlikely to address any particular theme unless the participants sculpt one during their brief period together.

  • talk: Boundary No Boundary
    13.30 Auditorium
    By: Tony Wade
    In May June and July 2018 artist Tony Wade walked, documented and painted the entire length of the Wakefield District Boundary. The boundary is a 60-mile long line which appears on maps but has no objective reality on the ground. To paint it he split the boundary into 20 x 3 mile stages and found a place in the middle of each stage to paint. He painted on three panels (40cm x 20cm) recording what he saw in 180 degrees from horizon to horizon looking outwards from the district. The series of 60 paintings record a complete view from the boundary looking out. Along the way he interviewed people living near this space to find out what it means to them. All the work collected will form a unique exhibition and online resource.

  • Talk (& walk): New Slices Through Old Places
    14.30 Auditorium & Outside
    By: Roger Boyle
    'Psychogeography for Beginners' manuals give the dilettante a hatful of techniques for navigating spaces in new, or unusual ways - 'draw a line', 'randomize a timetable' ... lots of us have tried lots of them and they are jolly good fun. The world probably doesn't need any more such techniques, but - nothing daunted – Boyle would like to propose some. If they have novelty, it is the scale, or abstraction level, at which they operate. They are easy to implement and 4WCoP delegates will be able to go outdoors and implement them immediately.

  • talk: The Walkies as Method- Experiments in Human Canine Psychogeography
    15.15 Auditorium
    By: Darren O'Brien
    This talk explores the relationship between human and canine entities, entangled in a walking adventure, where the boundaries of space, sensory experiences and trust are explored and challenged. This talk is an opportunity to share his recent MA research project, exploring walking as a method for thinking and making. The project explores issues of trust and empathy, sensory connections with urban, suburban and wild spaces through human canine entanglement.

  • Forum: Post-Industrial Landscapes
    15.15 Break-out Room
    By: Martin Eccles and David Sables

    Martin P Eccles : Trace No Trace. The presentation will describe the ideas within 'trace no trace' - a critical engagement with solitary movement through time-space. Resulting in a pair of installations utilising multi-channel sound and text, “No. 1: trace” took place inside and above Smallcleugh Level, a drift mine, in Nenthead; it examines walking in the context of a walk inside a lead mine and a second walk following the route of the underground passages on the fell above. 'No. 2: no trace' took place in the River Pont over the half mile where it flows inside the estate boundary of Cheeseburn Grange, Northumberland; and examines walking in the context of two walks (on the winter solstice and on the spring equinox), each one upstream and downstream, along a common route, in a river. Using Ingold’s idea of the trace, the presentation will critically interrogate walking across the two sites and four walks. Suggesting the presence and absence of the walker’s trace and the impact on walking of profound disruption of the walker’s senses (vision, hearing, balance), it offers the opportunity to reflect on the nature of solitary walking in particular, walking in general across space-time and how these are influenced by terrain.

    David Sables : Shadows On The Landscape. The presentation consist of a short film showing a person moving through a mixed urban and rural landscape with sound references relating to a pivotal point in the subjects life and the emotions this journey evokes. The film seeks to explore what is remembered and who decides what is remembered and how landscapes have been and are being reconstructed to eliminate cultural and working class memory reference points which are unpalatable to elites. The film was made as part of a Northern Film school Leeds Becket university project, called ‘Mining the Memories’ and is based on a poem Sables wrote some years ago based on memories of events during 1984/85 Miners’ Strike.

    Note: Short presentations followed by an open panel discussion

  • talk: Charles Conrad Abbott: Archaeologist, Naturalist, and New Jersey Psychogeographer
    15.45 Auditorium
    By: David Platt
    New Jersey occupies a complex position in America’s cultural imagination. Most people think of the state’s sprawl, malls, factories, landfills, and Super Fund Clean Up sites; yet, it is officially named “The Garden State” for its farmlands and remaining “wild” areas. The state is a mishmash of land-use types—in constant flux, as locations fall in and out of use. It is an edgeland state. Charles Conrad Abbott (1843-1919) authored books based on his walking explorations of rural and semi-rural New Jersey. Most focus on his wildlife observations, but also articulate a profound awareness of the region’s palimpsest of historical landscapes. His accounts of watchful walking, deep historical knowledge, and ethical core (including grief at the displacement of the Leni Lenape people)—mark him out as America’s first psychogeographer. Platt locates Abbott’s work in the context of contemporary psychogeography as well as American traditions of geographical writing (e.g., American romanticism, Deep Mapping), and revisits some of the locations where he walked. Most importantly, Platt argues that we can still learn from his practices, nearly a hundred years after his death, and Platt explains how Abbott’s example has helped him, a transplant from the northwest of England, begin his own explorations of his adopted home.

  • talk: Rambling in Northern Istanbul with 250 people: Walking as a Pedagogical Exploration for Architecture
    17.00 Auditorium
    By: Nazlı Tümerdem & Sevgi Türkkan
    In October 2017, the independent research project Istanbul Walkabouts and ITU first-year architectural design studio intersections3400 organized a 9-km walk in northern Istanbul with 250 students. Unlike the urbanized, industrialized and populated southern part of the city, northern Istanbul is sparsely populated with houses, villages, forests, water reserves and agricultural lands. Currently, this region is going through massive transformations due to mega-projects imposed via top-down approaches. The walk aimed to critically explore this site while experimenting with the use of walking as a transformative tool for architectural learning. The presentation aims to reflect upon the twofold manifestation of “terrain vague” in this walk: geographical and pedagogical. The former refers to ‘vacant’ operational landscapes of the city where the walk was performed; and the latter refers to doubtful traditions of architectural pedagogy: reliance on aerial views, plans, maps, as well as dichotomies of built-natural, urban-rural etc. that confine the understanding and designing of environments. Ultimately, the outcomes of walking-learning in Vague Terrains will be discussed through student works; installations located in various parts of the city, manifesting a statement based on their experience.

  • walk: The World's Shortest Derive
    17.15 Outside
    By: David Upton
    Last November Upton organised a derive in Waterloo station, London, at 6pm - the height of the rush hour. At this time, almost everyone on the station is rushing through, intent on reaching a precise spot just before the precise time when their next train leaves, or else standing still, waiting for something.They turned this on its head: they set a precise spot to reach, but agreed NOT to reach it before a distant time. As a result, they took 45 minutes to walk 70 yards. This surely qualifies as the shortest derive in history - in distance, at least. Roughly four feet a minute, or one short step every 30 seconds. (You mustn't stand still.) The idea was to impose their own time on their environment: to be in the station but in a different time space.

    Note: Participants will assemble in Heritage Quay and walk to St George’s Square (outside the Railway Station) where the derive will take place.
    Limited to 12 people, sign up in person at Heritage Quay.

  • game: Monopoly: the Psychogeography and Urban Exploration Edition
    18.30 The Head of Steam public house, St George’s Square
    By: Jamie McPhie & Taylor Butler-Eldridge
    A psychogeographical variation of the familiar boardgame. Anyone may join in.

    Note: This is at the same location for the evening social event. Everyone welcome.

Saturday 8th September 2018

Venue: Various locations around Huddersfield and the Colne Valley

Saturday, day 2, is a mainly mobile experience of walks and rides, interspersed with occasional talks. The general focus of activity will move gradually up the Colne Valley from Huddersfield to Marsden throughout the day. Several walks will start or finish at one of our two gathering points: the Red & Green Club in Milnsbridge and the Civic Hall in Slaithwaite. The day will end in the convivial surroundings of the Riverhead Tap, Marsden.

All events are free of charge. However, if you would like to make a donation you will be most welcome. Look out for the Blue Buckets.

Dependent upon weather conditions, some of the walks may pass over damp or difficult terrain, so please dress accordingly.

Participants are welcome to opt in and out at any point or to join us for the whole experience.

There is ample public transport to enable you to reach or depart from particular events. See the bus timetable here: https://www.wymetro.com/buses/timetables/185 or https://bustimes.org/localities/huddersfield and the train timetable here: https://www.northernrailway.co.uk/travel/timetables

Notable Landmarks

Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map)
Red & Green Club, 42 Bankwell Rd, Milnsbridge, HD3 4LU (map)
Riverhead Brewery Tap, Marsden (map)

Programme

  • talk: Welcome and Introduction
    10.00 Auditorium, Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield
    By: The Congress Organisers
    Explanation of how the many walks and events in the Colne Valley will fit together.

  • walk: PLATFORM SEVEN by Edge Ogs
    10.30 Springwood Tunnel Ventilation Shafts, Merton Street, Huddersfield HD1 4BP (map)
    By: Simon Bradley & Ursula Troche
    The performance is inspired by a multi-sensory consideration of the railway as emergent terrain vague. Shifting spaces, times, sounds, visions, smells, and memories are invoked by a series of ritualised procedures involving chanting, performance poetry, dreamscapes, portable sonics, and storytelling transporting the audience deep into the intimate workings of The Network. Bradley and Troche build their performance upon a spectrum of observations, from close up and from afar. The train epitomises Debord’s ‘rapid passage through varied ambiences’ and yet it runs on tracks in a linear fashion, hence their specialised strand of linear dérive research comes to bear here as they explore curved spacetime, uncovering myriad folded t(er)rains, and connections activated by encounters with and across lines and borders, edging into realms of quantum entanglement hidden even from trainspotters, as hungry caterpillars munch their ways through the countryside, across rivers, tunnelating through hills, and under the sea! What might appear as solid and linear becomes extremely vague and intensely wiggly.

    Note: The walk will terminate beneath the railway viaduct at Longroyd Lane, Paddock Foot HD1 4RY (map)
    Tickets are free, recommended and can be booked here via Ticketsource

  • ride: Journeys On The A62: A Bus Journey as a Vague Terrain for Artistic Inspiration
    10.30 Huddersfield Bus Station (Stand M)
    By: John Rooney
    Rooney invites a group of fellow-travellers to ride up and down the Colne Valley by bus. He wants everyone travelling with him to adopt the identity of “the Wand’rin Star”. The group will be observing the unusual and sometimes missed ideas thoughts and words along the way. Rooney will give everyone travelling an orange Silvine notebook (they are cheap buy and look great) for them to record their observations. The cover will be stamped with “I am the Wander’in Star”. The books will be a record of the journey, and a connected set of random observations and voices from the journey. From this Rooney will create a typographic response to their observations, as a collected set of overlaid language, this will create unusual connected sentences brought together by the journey.

  • walk: The Hauntology of Paddock Brow: A Walk Through Past, Present and Future.
    11.30 Commences beneath the railway viaduct at Longroyd Lane, Paddock Foot HD1 4RY (map) (Bus number 356 from Huddersfield stops nearby)
    By: Phil Wood
    A century ago Paddock Brow was a substantial industrial settlement, which is now partially demolished and disappeared beneath woods and edgeland scrub, but which planners have also considered for future housing and employment development. Walkers are invited to summon ghosts of the past, uncover some of the shady and spectral uses to which the land is currently put, and speculate on what may come next, or mourn the phantoms of imagined futures that will never be realised.

    Note: The walk will terminate at the Red & Green Club, 42 Bankwell Rd, Milnsbridge, HD3 4LU (map). This walk includes some rough ground so robust footwear and clothing is recommended. The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. Please book here for free tickets (via TicketSource)

  • walk/performance: Your Welcome To The Zone.
    11.45 Paddock Head (outside West Mount Vets, 158 Luck Ln, Huddersfield HD1 4RA (map) (Buses 301.302 and 356 from Huddersfield stop here).
    By: Sohail Khan
    Framed in and through the looking glass of the narratives, themes, dreams and ideas of Writer Brothers Strugatsky and Film Director Tarkovsky and all those others who have followed into the Zone, this walk will encompass and traverse the back hinterlands of the post- and modern-industrial wasteland of a fragment of the Colnevalley of what is now called an Edgelands territory. Interlopers to the Zone will choose to explore this luminal, liminal and subliminal space through the theatrics of their imaginations, acting with mindful intent upon themselves, crossing thresholds and divining meanings like psychonauts of a cosmic playground. We will be informed by a map that the Artist and Stalker Sohail Khan has constructed over years that marks the traces of interactions, rituals, artefacts, objects, visitants and happenings in this space. Here we will explore and unearth the possibilities of a place in which you may truly become Visitants yourselves, finding the traces, places and spaces that are at once the Zone of Colnevalley in a fractured Albion 2018. The Zone of the Film and the Book. The Zone of Moscow 1994. The Zone of any place where you can bring your mind to open upon the vista of the landscapes of your own imagination. Of Myth, Legend, Meta-story and the Unknown.

    Note: This space you will enter is disputed territory. It is also broken territory by definition of being Edgeland. The Stalker accepts no responsibility for any damage, bad experiences or other conditions that you may experience in the Zone. Any damage arising out of this experience whether they be criminal, civil, material or spiritual. The Zone is rough terrain so you must equip yourself for your sojourn there in matters of clothing, footwear and upon other matters of the soul. All forms of recording will be taking place. You may be recorded. You may be transmitted.
    The walk will terminate at the Red & Green Club, 42 Bankwell Rd, Milnsbridge, HD3 4LU (map). The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. Please book your free tickets here (via TicketSource)

  • talk: Traces of Victor
    13.00 Red & Green Club, 42 Bankwell Rd, Milnsbridge, HD3 4LU (map) (Bus numbers 181,182,183,184,185,186, 303, 304, 394 and 395 from Huddersfield stop near here)
    By: Dave Smith
    The 1907 election of Victor Grayson had a seismic effect on the country and the Colne Valley. Equally as shocking was his mysterious disappearance in 1920. The arrival of Victor in the Valley was an explosion of the urban into the rural. Liverpool-born and Manchester-based, and with the support of the radical Manchester set, he brought with him daringly modern ideas of socialism and equality. What lingering traces of Victor survive in the scene of his greatest moment? Did he leave behind evidence of what happened to him when he vanished? What if, just what if, he returned to the Colne Valley when he disappeared and lived out a life of peace and quiet, protected by his friends of ’07? This detective story will lead participants through the Colne Valley on the trail of Victor, making links across the centuries and reflecting on the nature of celebrity, controversy and mystery.

  • workshop: Pick Your Own Landscape
    14.00 and 15.15 Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Vicky Ola & Anzir Boodoo
    Use your imagination to cast your own fantasy landscape onto a silk screen using lamplight and shadows. Participants are free to cast a landscape of their own choosing onto a silk screen using shadow blocks and will be prompted to leave a line or two describing why they like it.

    Note: This event runs runs twice, at 2pm and again at 3.15pm

  • walk: Sonic Margins
    14.00 and 15.30 Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Victoria Karlsson
    This piece aims to explore the intersections of sound/place/inner experience through a sound walk undertaken by the participants. Using accessible and easy to use equipment such as smartphones and pen and paper, the participants will explore a given area, paying close attention to both outer sounds and environments and also their own inner experience, exploring how listening (both outer and inner) is an essential part of our relationship to the world.

    Note: This event runs twice, at 2pm and again at 3.30pm

  • walk: Time and Motion Studies
    14.30 Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Kevin Linnane
    The idea is to conduct a psychogeographical walk directed by chance, guided by the fates or the turn of a tarot card, with each suit designating a direction. The distance travelled will be governed by the sense of a place, when it feels right. The walk will be interrupted at intervals, again dictated by chance, stopping when it feels like the right place to stop and an activity will take place. First will be the reading of a story (mixture of fact and fiction) linked to the activity. Each activity has a mythical slant, such as frottage, divining, and water writing. One person is chosen at the start of the walk, by turn of the cards, to become the dealer and the rest of the group are participants.

  • walk: Threading And Treading the Labyrinth
    14.00 and 15.30 Horsefield, Slaithwaite, HD7 5HP (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Sonia Overall and Elspeth Penfold
    The labyrinth creates its own vague terrain: a sacred space in a secular setting; a treading out of inner journeys; a mapping of metaphor. Appearing puzzle-like and perilous, the labyrinth offers the prospect of becoming lost; yet by trusting the winding path, the walker's journey to the centre is guaranteed. Join walking textile artist Elspeth Penfold and psychogeographer Sonia Overall in an exploration of the labyrinth, a temporary vague terrain. Participants will be offered the opportunity to document their experience of walking the labyrinth through the knotting of handmade ropes. The ropes will be attached to a ‘vara’ or textile pole, which becomes a record of the walk. The mnemonic action of knotting ropes while negotiating the vague terrain of the labyrinth opens new possibilities of thinking creatively. Elspeth’s practice explores the relationship between walking, weaving and storytelling. Sonia’s research and teaching includes the use of labyrinths and other embodied approaches to creative writing.

    Note: This event runs twice, at 2pm and again at 3.30pm
    The Horsefield (map) is to the rear of Upper Mills, aka the ‘Be More Outdoors Forest School’ (see walking directions http://bemoreoutdoors.org/downloads/DIRECTIONS%20TO%20BMO.jpg)
    NEW Please book your free tickets here. Each walk is limited to 20.

  • walk: The Colne Valley Sculpture Trail
    16.30 Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Steve Goldman & Graeme Murrell
    “I am interested less in the wall, and more the area between the sky and the ground”. So says Karen Braithwaite, a land artist who works exclusively in the medium of drystone walling.
    Braithwaite is just one of a range of contemporary artists from around the world who have contributed to Colne Valley’s “Sculpture Trail”. Join curator Graeme Murrell, assisted by Steve Goldman, to walk the trail and respond to the artists and their works. In addition we hope to be asking your assistance to assess potential examination material for local students. (See SculptureTrail.pdf (PDF))

    Note: The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. Please book your free tickets here (via ticketsource).
    The walk will end on Manchester Road, close to the Olive Branch public house (map), from where a frequent bus service can be accessed.

  • walk: Vague Terrain- A Therapeutic Landscape?
    16.30 Slaithwaite Civic Hall, 15A New Street, Slaithwaite, HD7 5AB (map) (Bus numbers 394, 395 and 396 from Huddersfield stop nearby)
    By: Ewan Davidson & Michelle Woodall
    Davidson, Woodall and fellow members of Edinburgh psychogeographers, Drift and Derive, will lead an exploration of the ideas of landscape and therapeutic in vague terrain around Slaithwaite. Participants will be asked to consider their subjective responses to the area in these terms, frame their own landscapes and share their personal resonances, and their thoughts on what might or might not be therapeutic as we drift on towards Marsden.

    Note: The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. Please book your free tickets here (via ticketsource)
    The walk will end in Marsden

  • walk: 2.Walk
    18.45 Marsden Moor Estate Office, Station Rd, Marsden, HD7 6DH (map) (The site is adjacent to Marsden Railway Station and bus numbers 185 and 186 stop nearby)
    By: Irena Pivka & Brane Zorman
    New media sound performance, designed as a sound walk, which the spectator takes on a circular pre-delineated path and follows by means of a mobile app and headphones. With the help of sound images, imprinted into the location of the delineated path, she or he traverses between fictive and real situations. When one is walking a safe, known city path, one finds it hard to imagine that women in some parts of the world do not walk alone - that individual walking is connected with inappropriate, even illicit, behaviour. At this point, the mechanisms of control for safe walking of female individuals enter the picture, in the form of social regulations, which are, and will be in the near future, strengthened by the apparatuses of power, control and capital. Group collective walking, as a revolt and conquering of space, is a reflection of political action. What about individual walking? Can walking, as a personal and conscious choice, be the power of an individual? An intervention into the existing social system? Is it radical to walk? Walking as a possible means of resistance, so much more so when time and space are taken by a woman, a woman who has the social and self-regulating access to the time to walk.

    Note: The walk is limited to 25 people on a first-come first served basis. Please book your free tickets for 2.Walk here (via TicketSource)

  • social: Closing Social Event
    19.00 Riverhead Brewery Tap, Peel St, Marsden (map)
    By: Everyone
    Come join everyone to officially close the Congress at the Riverhead Brewery Tap, 2 Peel St, Marsden. We have the upstairs room booked out for us!

Who Took Part in 2018?

Alex J Bridger
Psychogeographer and senior lecturer in critical psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Currently writing a book about psychogeography and psychology which is due to be published in 2019. Co-organiser of the 4th World Congress of Psychogeography and the Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network. https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com/
Katrina Whitehead
A cross disciplinary artist currently teaching on the Fashion, Communication and Promotion degree programme at the University of Huddersfield in 2017, teaching Fashion Promotion and Creative Writing within the School of Art, Design and Architecture. The focus of Katrina’s research is in the area of community projects including a Creative Scene and Arts Council photography exhibition in Yorkshire and Tunisia, using the power of social media to connect people across the borders, to the history of the textile mill industry. http://katrinawhitehead.weebly.com
Andrew Taylor
A senior lecturer and researcher in fashion and textiles. Andrew’s research experiences are integral to and inform his art, design, and learning and teaching practice. Through practice focused research and collaboration with academic and industry partners he uses interactive tools and innovative methods that advance traditional art and design approaches in and and around real spaces, and 3D. https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewtaylor4d
Anna Davidson
Lecturer in human geography at the University of Huddersfield. Her research interests are in the intersections of sustainability and social justice, with a focus on feminist theory.
David Platt
An archaeologist and historian, originally from Greater Manchester in the North of England. He completed degrees in ancient history and archaeology at St David's University College (Coleg Prifysgol Dewi Sant)—now, University of Wales, Trinity Saint David (Prifysgol Cymru, Y Drindod Dewi Sant)—and the archaeology and ancient history of disease at University College London's Institute of Archaeology, before re-locating to the United States to earn a PhD in classical archaeology at Stanford. He has worked as a professional field archaeologist, bartender, various kinds of library paraprofessional, and Classics Bibliographer for Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources. From 2009 to 2011, he was a co-director of Binchester Roman Town archaeological excavations. He currently lives in New Jersey, recently completed his Masters of Library and Information Science at Rutgers, and works at Princeton University's Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology.
David Sables
An archaeologist with a deep interest in the politics of heritage and heritage is controlled and presented in an attempt to manipulate the cultural memories that are fundamental to the political make up of class and nation. I am presently researching amongst other things the archaeology of the British miners strike of 1984/85 and how the events of that year are being remembered and the destruction of informal class memories and their replacement with official narratives. https://otjc.org.uk/tag/mining-the-memories
David Upton
Recently retired from civil service / business career. Was studying digital culture and society at King's College London until just before 4WCOP starts, after that harbouring existential angst whilst developing an artistic practice. Founded 'Strand Strollers' psychogeography group.
John Rooney
Teaching Fellow in Graphic Design and Visual Communication at the University of Leeds. Currently working on a practice based typographic PhD, Journeys on the A664. www.johnrooney.co.uk
Kasia Breska
Kasia Breska studied Environmental Science at the University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Poland, then Fine Art at the Bradford School of Arts. Her research covers diverse fields, from philosophy and geography to architecture, urban design and art to environmental studies then language and its scripts.
Lesley Wood
I am a visual artist working in a range of media, on capturing beauty and meaning in experience of place, looking for the stories which emerge when the boundaries between people and place blur. I am particularly concerned with the impact of gender on 'freedom of movement'. lesleyeleanorwood.com
Martin P Eccles
My practice aims to reflect the experience of my presence in and walking through natural environments. I use a range of methods (predominantly sound and text) to respond to the time, distance, place and space of the landscape. I graduated in Fine Art from Newcastle University in 2016 and am currently studying for a PhD (Fine Art) p/t, Newcastle University, October. I have had solo shows/works at: The North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, Newcastle upon Tyne (2015); Fine Art Department, Newcastle University, Watchtower Gallery Berwick upon Tweed (2016); Culture Lab, Newcastle University (2017) and ‘Sound+Environment’, Hull, (2017) and on Framework Radion (2018). I have exhibited in group shows at: Watchtower Gallery Berwick upon Tweed (2014); XL Gallery Newcastle University (2015); Culture Lab, Newcastle University (2016, 2017) and to a group radio broadcast in 2017. I have published work in Alliterati magazine and contributed to various sound projects. https://martineccles613.wordpress.com
Nazlı Tümerdem
Nazlı Tümerdem is an architect/researcher/walker based in Istanbul. She received her BArch degree from Istanbul Technical University (2008) and MArch degree from Istanbul Bilgi University (2011). She has worked as a research assistant and as an architect between 2011 and 2016. She was part of the project team of Turkish Pavilion in 2016 Architectural Biennale of Venice. Currently, she is completing her PhD (2018) in Istanbul Technical University for which she walks around northern Istanbul. https://www.instagram.com/istanbulwalkabouts/
Sevgi Türkkan
Sevgi Türkkan, architect/researcher, completed her PhD in 2017 “Making and Breaking Authorship, Potentials in Architectural Design Studio” in Istanbul T.U. Faculty of Architecture which she has been working as a lecturer and studio tutor since 2004. Her published work in books, journals and conferences delve mainly in architectural design theory, pedagogy and authorship. She was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar in Columbia GSAPP New York(2009-2010) and a masters exchange student in T.U.Delft(2006). https://www.youtube.com/c/IstanbulWalkabouts
Roger Boyle
Retired Professor of Computer Science. Beekeeper. Scriptwriter. Stage performer. Sea swimmer. Intermediate [sic] quality bridge and chess player. Amateur, under-educated psychogeographer.
Simon Bradley
I am an ambulant sound artist and oral historian engaged with the exploration of institutional and disciplinary boundaries, borders, and edges of all kinds using a walking-based transdisciplinary methodology I call ‘Displacement Activities’. I developed this approach while working on my doctoral thesis (2016) which centred on the regeneration zone of Holbeck, Leeds. I continue to work with many artists across several locations both within the UK and internationally. www.displacementactivities.org
Tony Wade
Tony Wade is a professional artist who specialises in community co-created work. After graduating from Bretton Hall in 1986 Tony Wade has worked across the UK working with communities to explore their surroundings and to respond creatively to it. Tony Wade was Creative Director of Faceless Arts between 1999 and 2017. https://tonyfaceless.wordpress.com/
Ursula Troche
I write, walk, perform, do life modelling/live art, photography, enjoy space-and edge-exploration - in short: psychogeography. 'Foreigner-in-residence'. Some poems published here and there, the last one '100 minus 10', on the subject of women's suffrage, in the EList (art mag for Walthamstow Borough of Culture), the second-to-last one 'Our Caves' in the newsletter of the Philadelphia Association (RDLaing society). most recent art-projects in Torquay, Shrewsbury, and Belgium's East End.
Darren O'Brien
Darren is a Leicester based visual and sound artist exploring landscape and sensory entanglement. He's currently studying for an MA in Fine Art at Birmingham School of Art, following a long and varied career in mental health. His co conspirator, Dexter, is an 8 year old beagle with a passion for walkies and dindins. https://darrenobrienart.wordpress.com/current-projects/
David Smith
Dave is the Public Engagement Officer at Heritage Quay, the archive of the University of Huddersfield. He spends most days drifting in the collections, mostly not for an invited audience. He also spends a lot of time with spreadsheets and feedback forms. And biscuits.
Phil Wood
Phil Wood is the Urban Therapist, an intercultural path-beater scavenging the discarded edgelands of our settlements and memories; confronting us with our hubristic follies and rekindling our capacity for compassion and community. He works and walks all over the world but has never really left Huddersfield.  http://subversiveurbanism.tumblr.com
Ewan Davidson & Michelle Woodall
A group of psychogeographers working in Edinburgh inspired by a visit to 4WCOP last year. We organise a monthly derive, and exchange links, ideas and ephemera. Kind of like the crowd at the famous Sex Pistols gigs there are not many of us but we ve all formed our own practices (blogging, art , documentary, sound, photography). https://www.facebook.com/groups/138923466847418/
Irena Pivka
An artist, scenographer, architect and producer from Slovenia. She works in the areas of new media, sound and performance arts. In recent years, she has been focusing her artistic expressions on the preparations of sound-walk performances (Hodi Mesto, FFF, Walking the Perihelion/Aphelion), which, by means of transmission tools and sound pictures, through walking and listening establish space anew and reflect social reality. http://www.cona.si/hodi-ti/
Brane Zorman
A composer, sound and radio artist and producer from Slovenia. His work explores the possibilities of processing, presenting, perceiving, understanding, positioning and reinterpreting sound, space and ecology. By employing analogue and digital technologies and techniques, his work traverses the fields of music, multimedia, and visual space, using both sophisticated and simple tools, strategies, methods, and interactive interpretation models, soundscapes, evolving electronic and acoustic sound sculptures. http://www.cona.si/hodi-ti/
Kevin Linnane
Currently I teach photography at University Campus Oldham on a new FdA photography course. I have taught photography video editing and filmmaking at at various educational institutions Previously I have organised workshops in gallery settings with The Turnpike Gallery in Leigh and the Tate Gallery Liverpool as part of their educational programmes. This was a combination of gallery educational workshop and site-specific work in areas in local communities. www.kevinlinnane.com
Sohail Khan
Sohail Khan has been engaged in making art based processes and products since 1983. His work has a high level of performative quality to it as he comes from a theatre based back ground. He also writes creates film work and music and collaborates with a number of artists on a diverse range of projects. His Live Art has been described as 'challenging', 'threatening,' 'meaningful', and 'delightful' by audiences and participants. Sohail has also worked for the past twenty five years within the applied arts. Currently he works as a freelance drama practitioner /devisor/writer and artistic director for a number of arts/educational organisations in the North developing work that is centered on young people's learning and well being through creative practice. Sohail has also performed at the National Review of Live Art in Glasgow (NRLA) and Spill Festival National Platform in London, as well as having been commissioned for Hull Time Based Arts and Red Gallery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgHJvQZ0ZaI&authuser=0
Sonia Overall
Sonia Overall is a writer, psychogeographer and lecturer in Creative Writing. Her research and teaching includes the use of labyrinths and other embodied approaches to creative writing. www.soniaoverall.net
Elspeth Penfold
Elspeth Penfold is walking textile artist. Her practice explores the relationship between walking, weaving and storytelling. elspeth-billie-penfold.com
Steve Goldman
Steve Goldman has spent the last ten years on a series of bizarre wanderings and other travel and map related activities. He only recently came across the term 'Psychogeography', which pleased him no end because he now finally has an answer to the question 'What the fuck are you doing?'. The result of some of his endeavours are collected on mapfodder.com.
Graeme Murrell
Graeme Murrell is an artist based in Huddersfield. His interest is mostly connected to experimental multimedia works involving text, sound and performance. Since the 1990s, he has been involved with several publication projects such as Frontal Lobe, a small press magazine of poetry, scurrilous writing and other rants and Electric Dogs, an unpublished novel. He has also been the member of avant-jazz band Trump and later the freeform music group the 'F*ks and the duo The Importance Of...' He is the editor of the website Monocular Times which curates Situationist writing and other writing and hosts the site of pressure group Huddersfield Gem who are dedicated to the preservation of Huddersfield’s Queensgate Market. He is the member of the Sedentary Committee for the Consideration of Gradual Change and continues to curate the Institute for the Preservation of Bad Art, which is dedicated to saving poorly executed artworks from landfill. He devised and led ‘Over Here Over There’ which was a psychogeographical exploration of the territory between twin towns in West Yorkshire and the Ruhr Valley.
Vicky Ola & Anzir Boodoo
Vicky Ola (Artist / Psychologist) and Anzir Boodoo (Urban Geographer / Maker) have frequently worked together to illustrate scientific and environmental concepts using a wide variety of media. The work, whether with researchers and scientists or with the wider public generally promotes mental well being in relation to the environment. Workshops and Installations and have been described as, “both informative and fun.”
Victoria Karlsson
A sound artist interested in the emotional and subjective aspects of sound and art. Investigating sound as both an inner and outer experience, she explores how we think about, remember, dream about sounds, and how this influences our experiences of sounds in our everyday. She is currently undertaking a PhD Research Degree at University of the Arts, London. Her research investigates sounds in thoughts, asking if we hear sounds in our minds, what they mean to us and where they come from. http://www.victoriakarlsson.co.uk/

2017 Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography Sept

NEW RTE Inside Culture about the Congress

The Irish national radio station’s RTE 1 Inside Culture show featured the World Congress, interviewing a number of participants and covering a wide range of things, amongst a rather good show about Psychogeography in general. If you were at the Congress you might have met and chatted with Regan. Sonia Overall, Morag Rose, Gareth Rees, Kevin Boniface and Barbara Lounder were featured, as well as the voices of Graeme Murrell and Dave Smith are heard.
RTE Inside Culture
RTE Inside Culture on Sound Cloud

2017 Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography 8,9,10 Sept

Video Recordings from the 2017 Congress

Indoor talks in the main auditorium were streamed and recorded live on Friday and Saturday, and you can watch them here:
Friday Video Recordings
Saturday Video Recordings

RTE Inside Culture about the 2017 Congress

The Irish national radio station’s RTE 1 Inside Culture show featured the World Congress, interviewing a number of participants and covering a wide range of things, amongst a rather good show about Psychogeography in general. If you were at the Congress you might have met and chatted with Regan. Sonia Overall, Morag Rose, Gareth Rees, Kevin Boniface and Barbara Lounder were featured, as well as the voices of Graeme Murrell and Dave Smith are heard.
RTE Inside Culture
RTE Inside Culture on Sound Cloud


Programme for 8,9,10 September 2017 (PDF)

Friday 8th September 2017

Venue: Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield

Friday Video Recordings

  • Talk: Welcome Address
    10.30 Auditorium
    By: The Congress Organisers.
    A Welcome to the Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography

  • Talk: The Fundamentals of the Psychogeographical Method
    10.45 Auditorium
    By: Fenella Brandenberg and David Bollinger
    Bollinger and Brandenberg are world leading psychogeographers and in this key-note talk they will take you on a grand tour of what psychogeography is all about and will explain how to go about creating your own psychogeographical adventures.
    They will also be promoting their new book, The Fundamentals of the Psychogeographical Method, which will be published by Dodo Press in 2018. Their soon to be published book has received outstanding positive reviews from well-known psychogeographers such as Luther Blissett, ‘this book will change your life!’, Victor Salamanca describing the book as ‘a journey into the heart of darkness and a fascinating snapshot of who we are, lit by Bollinger and Brandenburg’s vivid prose. I’m sure that it will be read in a thousand years from now’ and also Rudolf Rudenski commenting that ‘Psychogeography is in crisis. Anyone that calls themselves a psychogeographer is actually a pseudo-psychogeographer. Bollinger and Brandenburg show us how to carve a path through the crap of psychogeography and they boldly point the way to a new way of doing psychogeography foregrounding an agenda for social change and action’.

  • Talk: Psychologists Working Towards Social Justice: How Can We Walk The Talk?
    11.15 Auditorium
    By: Brendan Bootland, Suzanne Elliot and Nick Hartley
    In 2015, a group of psychologists led by Dr Ste Weatherhead walked the 100 miles from the British Psychological Society offices in Leicester to the branch office in London. Stopping at food banks, hostels and charities along the way, the aim was to raise awareness of the impact of social policies on mental health with a specific focus on food poverty, homelessness and the benefits system. Suzanne Elliott and Nick Hartley joined with the group for part of the walk. They describe the reasons for psychologists getting involved with such projects, and discuss the tradition of community psychology from which projects like these have developed. Suzanne, who works for a homeless mental health service in Leicester, also draws on her work experiences to further raise awareness of issues around homelessness in the UK. Reflections on the impact of the walk and the changes in attitudes towards homelessness will also be given by Brendan who has his own lived experience of sleeping rough in Leeds.

  • Walk: Short Personal Heritage Walks
    12.00 - 12.45 Outside
    By: Graeme Murrell
    This idea is a response both to Phil Smith's appeal at last year's 4th World Congress for inclusive derives which are accessible to those who may find it difficult to take part in the long meanderings characteristic of most flaneur activity,and to the request for activities which subvert the concept of heritage.
    This will be a short 15 minute derive involving no more than 15 participants. It will follow a zigzag route away from the source followed by a direct return to the source. Each day's derive will begin at a different source. At each point where the derive changes course, a participant will be asked to share something short (a historical or architectural reference, random thought, sweets, personal reminiscence or something else in response to the space we find ourselves in).
    The heritage exposed will therefore be shared and directionless, an overlapping narrative determined by the personal experiences and desires of the participants. Unlike a guided walk the narrative is most likely to be fractured and unexpected, and is unlikely to address any particular theme unless the participants sculpt one during their brief period together.

    Note: Repeated on Saturday and Sunday. Limited to 15 people for each walk.

  • Talk & Walk: Smells of the city: Scent, modernity and psychogeographical perspectives
    12.45 Auditorium & then outside
    By: Witold Van Ratingen
    Urban smells have a bad rep: typically the first to come to mind are the stench of urine, garbage, and smog. Given the medical dangers of unsanitary urban odours, it comes as no surprise that cities since modernity have viewed their own deodorization as a public responsibility. Our liberal use of chemical air fresheners, strict zoning laws, and rigorous hygiene regulations come, however, at a steep price; after all, the scents we grow up with are inextricably interwoven with our deepest memories and collective cultural identity. Smell walks have emerged as a means for urban dwellers to reacquaint and re-sensitise themselves with the most under-appreciated sensuous delight that the city can offer. Perhaps such walks could serve as a form of psychogeographic activism, in an attempt to restore lost olfactory identity to our cities. This talk will offer a brief history of urban smells and their disappearance, as well as providing a simple theoretical framework to think about environmental smells. Subsequently, we will embark on a collective 'smell walk,' following our noses to re-inscribe lost meanings and memories upon Huddersfield.

  • Talk: Walking the walk: Can psychogeography save the world?
    13.45 Auditorium
    By: Morag Rose
    What is the point of getting lost in the contemporary city? This provocative talk will question the relevance of psychogeography today and ask what difference creative walking can really make within the all-encompassing spectacle. In the past Morag has claimed that “the dérive has the potential to transform the everyday, to illuminate and challenge narratives of privatisation, commodification and securitization of space, and navigate increasingly blurred boundaries between public/private” but what difference does it really make? Can psychogeography actually bring any useful tools, tactics and lessons to radical struggles or has its political potential been entirely neutered by commodification and recuperation? These questions will be explored through field notes and reflections from many years on the psychogeographical frontline.

  • Talk: SOLAR: Walking at the Speed of Light
    14.45 Auditorium
    By: Annie Watson
    SOLAR is a collaborative arts and technology project that maps the solar system across the city of Sheffield, England, to the nearby Peak District through a series of specially commissioned artworks and a related walking app: available on Itunes.
    Our intention is to collaborate with an international academic community, using this app as a tool to map unique walks in other countries and cities. The SOLAR app allows individual or curated artworks to be embedded for each location, so each SOLAR walk would be bespoke. We envisage that sound, music or text could be commissioned for each planet. The eight planets of our solar system were assigned to a geographical location at a distance from the centre of Sheffield (the sun) representing the relative orbit of the planet and measured at a scale where the average walking speed represents the speed of light.
    Participants enjoyed the gamification of finding the planets, and downloading the artwork, exploring parts of the city they had previously not walked around, and the experience of walking the distances between the planets. Neptune is so far away!

  • Talk: Walking Over Edges: A Personal Embodied Practice Experience
    15.45 Auditorium
    By: Ursula Troche
    Over the years I have come to realize that I am, increasingly, practising psychogeographic walking. It echoes and mirrors in the landscape, what I do in my work as an artist (and migrant): in poetry and photography, performance. My art-work is not ordinary work, ‘not a proper job’, not accounting, factory work, intangible. And here psychogeographic terrain comes in: doing something, going somewhere beyond proper definition, causing consternation to the (anti) social (divisive) set-up. Walking/work here means going over edges of ready-made definitions, imaginations, concepts, assumptions. In (quasi-postcolonial) refusal of mimicry (Bhaba), it is about dropping repetitions and finding new spaces, new texts, new signs and symbols. Like entropy in communication theory (Shannon, 1948) and moving ‘from work to text’ (Barthes). Like embodying the Id in psychoanalytic theory: the walking id: I am walking, id is walking! Taking up the space of the unconscious in reverse: I, the walker, am the unconscious to society, but conscious to myself.
    In my presentation (with poetry and photos), I like to talk about/discuss the challenges and (social) opportunities of engaging in this practice which eludes popular definition relating to, e.g.: positive provocation/irritation, nature-writing, psychotherapy, (non-dualistic) revolution.

  • Talk: New Spectacle, New Drift, New Psyche
    16.45 Auditorium
    By: Phil Smith
    Through the political spasms of the last year, clumsy expressions of deep rhythms of change, a new kind of Spectacle is emerging from its old ‘integrated’ form into a new meshwork of ‘post-truths’. This trend to vaporisation is thinning the relationships between different landscapes (including rural and urban) - and the jellies are coming!! In this presentation I will attempt to describe how psychogeographers can draw on the tensions within such changes and exploit them for their own ‘drifts’, arming their bodies in transit. I will describe a ‘war on subjectivity’, the opportunities for walking in the ripples of atomic suburbs and a new kind of dérive for developing a resistant psyche, adapted to the conditions of the ‘war’. I will conclude with a few findings from my recent ‘Anywhere’ project about how we can use the abandoned ruins of New Babylon curled up inside hidden dimensions of the hypermodern city.

  • Talk: Psychogeography Of The Fourth World
    17.45 Auditorium
    By: Roy Bayfield
    The Fourth World is a fictional entity that has featured in a range of comic books and associated media since its creation in the 1970s by Jack Kirby, ‘the William Blake of comics’ (Grant Morrison). In series such as ‘The New Gods’ and ‘The Forever People’ this mythical ‘world’ intersected with our own, in powerful and, arguably, prophetic illustrated narratives. As a teenage boy Roy Bayfield would undertake lengthy walks to seek out these comic books and the irruptions of the numinous they could cause. Having recreated these walks using techniques from his book ‘Desire paths: real walks to nonreal places’, Roy will provide an experiential account of the Fourth World as it manifests today in the mundane reality of South Coast streets.

Saturday 9th September 2017

Venue: Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield

Saturday Video Recordings

  • Workshop: Dérive through the archives
    11.00 Break-Out Room
    By: Dave Smith
    Join Dave Smith on an adventure through the Heritage Quay archives. What stories, ideas and connections exist between seemingly disparate objects and how can we trace them? In this workshop, help create new narratives and relationships across time and space, exposing the gaps between conventional historiography and the wider world. This is archival research meets fever dream and will let you learn as much about yourselves as historical fact. No prior knowledge actively encouraged.

    Note: This event is repeated in the afternoon.

  • Talk / Walk: Introduction to Derive Day
    11.00 Auditorium
    By: West Yorkshire Traipsers
    Today, 9 Sept. is Dérive Day, organised by Dérive App. Join flaneurs across the world in a hosted dérive. Starting a number of times during the day, participants are presented the exact same task cards simultaneously wherever you are in the world. Share your experiences on social media as a testimony to your own unique dérive, photos, thoughts and locations around the world. Dérive App is a mobile app for Iphone and Android. View the Derive Day flyer (PDF)
    New! You can get started right now and join the 4WCOP Group within Derive App to which all members can contribute. Participants can add cards, vote on cards, add artwork and vote on artwork.

    Note: There will be a short introduction indoors than we will go outside at 11:15 to participate in the first hosted derive. Hosted derives are at 11.15, 1pm and 3pm on Saturday.

  • talk: Digital mythologies, virtual ambulations and the cyberflâneur: Psychogeography in the Internet age
    12.00 Auditorium
    By: Ally Standing & Gavin Rogers
    'In a dérive, one or more persons, during a certain period, drop their usual motives for movement and action, their relations, their work and leisure activities, and let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there.' (Debord, 1956) Despite being over 50 years old, this quote from Guy Debord’s Theory of the Dérive has a certain contemporary familiarity - substitute ‘In a dérive’ for ‘When browsing’, and this would serve as an appropriate description of the kind of (often idle)Internet surfing which most of us engage in on a daily basis.
    In a performative lecture touching upon various facets of life in the digital age - such as social media, augmented reality, and web mapping services - we will explore psychogeography in the age of the app, considering the rise (and fall) of the cyberflâneur, and whether or not certain recent technological advancements have changed what it means to explore.

  • walk: The Centre
    12.00 Outside & Break-out Room
    By: Tim Waters
    Find the centre! Is there any relationship between being centred and being in the town centre? Do you see yourself working on the margins, at edgy, liminal spaces, or maybe you feel strung out doing psychogeography? Jung believed that finding a way to the centre of the personality was the upmost need of today. A link to the centre is a tie to the earth, our home. We will try to find a way to the (town) centre in this event. Participants on this walk will form into small groups of 3 based on their personality types - extraverts, intuitives and logicians. Extraverts are encouraged to interact with the public and ask people where the town centre is for them and then they will walk there. Intuitives are asked to feel where the centre is, possibly finding genii loci or energetic places. Logicians will use paper maps, measurements and computers to find the centre and optionally head out to find what its like.

    Note: Feel free to bring instruments, dowsing rods, pendulums, maps etc. This event starts and ends at the Break-out room.

  • Walk: Short Personal Heritage Walks
    13.00 Outside
    By: Graeme Murrell
    This idea is a response both to Phil Smith's appeal at last year's 4th World Congress for inclusive derives which are accessible to those who may find it difficult to take part in the long meanderings characteristic of most flaneur activity,and to the request for activities which subvert the concept of heritage.
    This will be a short 15 minute derive involving no more than 15 participants. It will follow a zigzag route away from the source followed by a direct return to the source. Each day's derive will begin at a different source. At each point where the derive changes course, a participant will be asked to share something short (a historical or architectural reference, random thought, sweets, personal reminiscence or something else in response to the space we find ourselves in).
    The heritage exposed will therefore be shared and directionless, an overlapping narrative determined by the personal experiences and desires of the participants. Unlike a guided walk the narrative is most likely to be fractured and unexpected, and is unlikely to address any particular theme unless the participants sculpt one during their brief period together.

    Note: Tickets details coming soon. Repeated on Friday and Sunday. Limited to 15 people for each walk.

  • Walk / Eat: Workers' Lunchtime
    13.00 Outside
    By: Rob Kilner
    Explore the spatial and temporal limits of a lunchtime through a crowd‐sourced tour of Huddersfield Market. Following our noses we will create a spontaneous smorgasbord of vernacular Huddersfield gastronomy and then sit to share and destroy it with our teeth and taste buds.

    Note: Limited to 6 people.

  • Workshop: Dérive through the archives
    13.30 Break-Out Room
    By: Dave Smith
    Join Dave Smith on an adventure through the Heritage Quay archives. What stories, ideas and connections exist between seemingly disparate objects and how can we trace them? In this workshop, help create new narratives and relationships across time and space, exposing the gaps between conventional historiography and the wider world. This is archival research meets fever dream and will let you learn as much about yourselves as historical fact. No prior knowledge actively encouraged.

    Note: This event is repeated in the afternoon.

  • Walk: Mishtory Tour
    14.00 Outside
    By: Sonia Overall
    A dérive that pauses to take in the secret stories of sites whose pasts remain unwritten. Why is this aspect of urban heritage so uncelebrated? Because we have yet to make it up... Part counter‐tourism, part psychogeography game, participants on this mishtory tour will reimagine buildings and plots and the events that may have played out there. What fateful incident occurred on the site of that betting shop? Who is the mysterious figure that haunts the bins behind the pizza place? And what terrible truth connects the destinations encountered on this walk? Open to all creative thinkers: ignorance of local history knowledge will be an advantage.

    Note: Walk repeated Saturday and Sunday. Limited to 15 people on each walk.

  • Talk: Kick It Wicked: Graffiti as cultural history and terror in Philadelphia
    14.00 Auditorium
    By: Tyson Mitman
    In the global graffiti era, where images are shared instantaneously, places that can keep their specific styles are a rarity. These places hold tightly to their stylistic traditions and imbue them with a great deal of the subculture’s local history, collective memory, and culture. New York City claims the Broadway elegant handstyle as its own. Sao Paulo, has a unique graffiti style called pixação. And Philadelphia has the wicked. Philadelphia writers say that there is no more original, important, esoteric or Philadelphia-specific graffiti style than Philly wickeds. Wickeds are very complex tags that often said to look like “scribble scrabble” to the uninitiated. But for those who can decipher them they are a form of cultural terroir. They are combinations of the elements of style that previous generations of writers have worked to create and they represent a dedication to style and craft that is found nowhere else in the graffiti world. This talk will help to demystify these tags, and explain their history and their cultural value and development. It will also explain why graffiti writers, who are enamoured with the idea of “fame” and recognition, dedicate so much time and effort into learning a style that is often illegible and indiscernible to the majority of the population. The talk will conclude with a short walk along the Huddersfield Canal to observe local graffiti.

    Note: There is an accompanying walk that follows this talk.

  • Walk: Kick It Wicked Walk
    14.30 Outside
    By: Tyson Mitman
    Walk accompanying the preceeding talk. A short walk along the Huddersfield Canal to observe local graffiti.

  • Talk: Total Absence of Recall: Arnie, the Hapsburgs & Social Amnesia in Graz, Austria
    14.30 Auditorium
    By: Andrea Capstick
    This talk contrasts an ‘official’ guided tour of Graz, Austria in April 2017 with an informal derive along the banks of its river, the Mur, the same day. The former, an orthodox history of the city - the birthplace of Arnold Schwarzenegger and traditional stamping ground of the Habsburg monarchs – had been subjected to a typical form of narrative smoothing which elides less comfortable truths. The latter took in the remains of the former POW-turned-death camp Graz-Liebenau; a children’s playground in an area populated by economic migrants and asylum seekers which now occupies the same site; the Puchsteg bridge, built by forced labour in 1942, and a current protest camp against a proposed hydro-electric dam. The presentation will consist of photographs, associated musings and ramblings, and the occasional random fact.

  • Workshop: Chasing The Whale
    15.00 Break-out Room
    By: Gopal Dutta
    “Whale” is a graffiti artist active in Manchester. I do not know the artist. I have seen his/her/their work on my walk to work. The graffiti is a simple “tag”, in the shape of a whale, which varies greatly in size, colour and design. See examples of 'Whale'
    I will present a slideshow of different sightings of “Whale”, with a map indicating locations. I will show whales which are now “extinct” – painted over by other graffiti artists or Construction / development officials. The presentation will explore: “Tagging” and the prolific nature of “Whale” across a specific area in Manchester. The anthromorphic and elastic nature of Whale as differentiating aspects with regard to other graffiti. Graffiti as an active questioning, an alternative means of orientation. It affords a new imagination of the City. Graffiti as 'political' / 'protest' etc. I'll present other examples of graffiti and street art in Manchester, to show the range and where whale fits, as I see it. I'll draw on some literature for this part of the talk. “Whale” in relation to the novel Moby-Dick. Upper Chorlton Road as the Pacific Ocean. Whale’s possible extinction? Myself as a topsy-turvy Ahab?
    There will also be a couple of activities: Participants will be encouraged to draw their own whales using a range of different pens and mark-making instruments, on a range of different surfaces (paper / card / glass / metal) Participants will be invited to share their own stories about memorable graffiti from their own towns and cities.

  • Talk: Back on the map or a clean sweep? An EU migrant trailing enemy aliens in Yorkshire during the centenary years
    15.30 Auditorium
    By: Claudia Sternberg
    In this illustrated talk, I introduce and provide the rationale for a heritage trail to be launched on location in Lofthouse, West Yorkshire, during the 2017 Heritage Open Days. The trail has a World War One theme: it starts at the commemorative patch outside Outwood Memorial Hall, straddles along the site of a former internment camp for German and Austrian civilians and terminates at Rothwell Cemetery.
    The trail makes reference to people, places and events from the first two decades of the 20th century. Additionally, however, I chart my own mappings and counter-mappings which connect past and present, national war memory and post-Referendum sensibilities. Inspiration comes from historiography, walks and encounters as well as psychogeographical concepts and Shaun Levin’s writing maps. In my reflection on vanished sites and perceived presences, I also comment on ‘the camp’, this transient non-place that always complicates palimpsestic narratives.

  • walk: Superstore Carparks
    16.00 Outside
    By: Gareth Rees
    Chain store car parks dominate our urban areas. Many assume that they are ‘non-places’, but for two years I’ve been walking around car parks and never found one the same. History, culture and topography leach into the car park. There’s public art, as well as unofficial public art (graffiti, posters, stickers). Car parks are used for unofficial activities, skateboarding, car stunts, drug dealing, dogging. They are also hotspots for crime, violence, mugging and sexual deviancy. Despite being heavily monitored private areas they are a blind spot in which activities go unnoticed.
    My walk will take people through two car parks, looking for unusual features, illicit human activity, strange markings, hints of history and topography. I’ll begin with a presentation about my ideas regarding car parks, and a reading of one of my car park investigations, so that attendees can get an idea of what they need to be looking for and thinking about. At the end of the walk we can share notes and discuss what we’ve seen and felt. This is a transgressive activity because car parks are for store patrons only, and not for leisure walks, loitering or psychogeographic tours. We’re there without permission!

    Note: This walk is repeated on Sunday. Limited to 20 people on each walk.

  • Performance: A Guided Tour of the Pocket Museum of Displacements
    16.00 Outside
    By: Simon Bradley
    An intervention that takes place within another walk, or whilst walking between two events. The intervention will occur suddenly and without prior introduction, as an interruption of the activity in progress. Simon will introduce the museum and tell the tale of each piece as he moves it from the pocket container onto the selected site. At the end of the performance, the pieces are placed back in the pocket museum and the event/walk will continue without further ado.

    Note: Scheduled to occur during Gareth Rees's Walk at the same time.

  • Participative Performance: I'm the City of Other Who Are The City - a participatory urban pilgrimage
    16.00 Outside
    By: Elia Rita
    An urban pilgrimage will be performed in Huddersfield as an act of worship to the urban landscape and its inhabitants, turning it into a sacred site for a short period of time. The simple act of walking is chosen for its ability to be a non-violent method of reclamation and activation of the public space. Space that conforms our individual and shared identities, proved to be essential for democracy. Space, therefore, to preserve and question.
    The action consists of a series of repeated movements that will be done in silence, as it requires a heightened consciousness of the space and circumstances around oneself. These will be taught to the audience during the introduction.
    Eastern spiritual practices have informed this performance; a foreign cultural heritage has been studied with the acknowledgment that a form of appropriation is likely to be playing part in this work. Its original spiritual purposes are broadened to become aesthetic and political, but if it enters the art market, this intangible heritage will be inevitably commodified. As a result, its message will be shared with a wider audience, bringing awareness of the loss of public space and the accelerated pace of living that individualizes our community decisions, but can also mute that message.
    TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS EVENT you are encouraged to bring along:
    White trousers and t-shirt / sweater.
    3 pairs of white socks per person
    Small notebook and pen

    Note: Registration is encouraged to participate and spectators welcome.

  • Film / Talk: Fragments For A City In Ruins
    16.30 Auditorium
    By: Sara Rees
    Set in contemporary Athens, Fragments For A City In Ruins is an essay film composed of photographic images and narrated fragments of text written by W.G. Sebald, Walter Benjamin, and Italo Calvino. Exploring themes such as memory, history, civilization and destruction, the work of these writers is profoundly informed by their experiences of fascism, Nazism and the Second World War. The film re-imagines their writing within the current geopolitical context of Europe, tracing through the city of Athens the entwined histories of empire and ruins.
    Using a Sebaldian juxtaposition of photographs and text, the film seeks to generate new and unexpected connections and resonances; between the past and the present, between colliding narratives and histories. As in Sebald’s work, the film’s narrator is a peripatetic wanderer, a figure who, in the context of the refugee crisis, evokes one of the most pressing issue of our current times. Weaving together textual fragments, the film seeks to challenge the monolith of hegemonic historical narrative, proposing instead a poly-focal and multi-vocal perspective of memory and history.
    The presentation will include a screening of the film followed by a lecture exploring the work's political and conceptual concerns.

  • Music / Talk / Film: Most Difficult Thing Ever
    18.00 Auditorium
    By: Kevin Boniface, Steven Beever, & Marc Layton-Bennett
    Artists/musicians Steven Beever, Marc Layton-Bennett, and Kevin Boniface will help you to make a bit less sense of Huddersfield through its frost damaged backyard buddhas, its bag-for-lifes, its salmon and potato dog food, its polythene trees, its Susans and its Geoffs, its Pot Noodle Portakabins, its mid-winter flip-flops, its couch grass window-boxes, its gin and slim on noughties decking, its talk of chimineas and quad bikes, its heated discussions about lorne sausage, its swanee-whistling starlings and its ketchup stained promotional air-dancers.
    A Huddersfield experience realised in film, soundscape, music, and talking out loud.

Sunday 10th September 2017

Venue: S2R Creative Space, 5-7 Brook St, Huddersfield HD1 1EB

  • Walk: Superstore Carparks
    11.00 Outside
    By: Gareth Rees
    Chain store car parks dominate our urban areas. Many assume that they are ‘non-places’, but for two years I’ve been walking around car parks and never found one the same. History, culture and topography leach into the car park. There’s public art, as well as unofficial public art (graffiti, posters, stickers). Car parks are used for unofficial activities, skateboarding, car stunts, drug dealing, dogging. They are also hotspots for crime, violence, mugging and sexual deviancy. Despite being heavily monitored private areas they are a blind spot in which activities go unnoticed.
    My walk will take people through two car parks, looking for unusual features, illicit human activity, strange markings, hints of history and topography. I’ll begin with a presentation about my ideas regarding car parks, and a reading of one of my car park investigations, so that attendees can get an idea of what they need to be looking for and thinking about. At the end of the walk we can share notes and discuss what we’ve seen and felt. This is a transgressive activity because car parks are for store patrons only, and not for leisure walks, loitering or psychogeographic tours. We’re there without permission!

    Note: This walk is repeated on Saturday. Limited to 20 people on each walk.

  • Walk: Mishtory Tour
    12.00 Outside
    By: Sonia Overall
    A dérive that pauses to take in the secret stories of sites whose pasts remain unwritten. Why is this aspect of urban heritage so uncelebrated? Because we have yet to make it up... Part counter‐tourism, part psychogeography game, participants on this mishtory tour will reimagine buildings and plots and the events that may have played out there. What fateful incident occurred on the site of that betting shop? Who is the mysterious figure that haunts the bins behind the pizza place? And what terrible truth connects the destinations encountered on this walk? Open to all creative thinkers: ignorance of local history knowledge will be an advantage.

    Note: Walk repeated Saturday and Sunday. Limited to 15 people on each walk.

  • Walk: Short Personal Heritage Walks
    13.15 Outside
    By: Graeme Murrell
    This idea is a response both to Phil Smith's appeal at last year's 4th World Congress for inclusive derives which are accessible to those who may find it difficult to take part in the long meanderings characteristic of most flaneur activity,and to the request for activities which subvert the concept of heritage.
    This will be a short 15 minute derive involving no more than 15 participants. It will follow a zigzag route away from the source followed by a direct return to the source. Each day's derive will begin at a different source. At each point where the derive changes course, a participant will be asked to share something short (a historical or architectural reference, random thought, sweets, personal reminiscence or something else in response to the space we find ourselves in).
    The heritage exposed will therefore be shared and directionless, an overlapping narrative determined by the personal experiences and desires of the participants. Unlike a guided walk the narrative is most likely to be fractured and unexpected, and is unlikely to address any particular theme unless the participants sculpt one during their brief period together.

    Note: Tickets details coming soon. Repeated on Friday and Saturday. Limited to 15 people for each walk.

  • Gaming Workshop: Co-operativinya Street Stalingrad
    14.00 IQ Gaming, 23 Byram St.
    By: Russell King
    This event uses a simple, easily learnable manual wargame to communicate the surroundings and mores/customs of another City and another time. In the two hours, participants will be guided through a play of the game in which they will explore the Cityscape in detail and interact with other participants. This session is for up to eight people, with even numbers preferred but not absolutely necessary.
    The Battle of Stalingrad1 in 1942 was an iconic struggle. In this walking tour of the City set in 1942, participants will experience first-hand the life of infantry soldiers on the ground, the chief actors of the war. In 1973, Simulations Publications Incorporated2 of New York, New York published a commercial wargame called Sniper!3, notable in being a first serious dynamic portrayal of man-to-man combat. It presaged many now commonplace things: professional military simulations, role-playing and sports games, first person shoot-‘em-up computer games such as Grand Theft Auto, and medical and architectural simulations. Sniper! was a best-selling wargame designed by James F Dunnigan4 - a unique talent in military simulation. The mapboard oddly depicted buildings as trapezoids.
    In the two hours, participants will sit around a map and be guided by the facilitator, who is an experienced teacher, wargamer and medical disaster simulator, through a play of the game in which they themselves will explore the Cityscape in detail and interact with the simulated environment and other participants. No previous wargaming experience is required. The task facing the participants is indeed to walk around the Co-operatvinya Street area, deal with what they find, and get home safely again, in the manner they wish.

    Note: This event is held at IQ Gaming which is just across the road. (map). Limited to 8 players, but spectators are encouraged.

  • Film / Talk: Fragments for A City in Ruins
    14.15 Main Room, S2R
    By: Sara Rees
    Set in contemporary Athens, Fragments For A City In Ruins is an essay film composed of photographic images and narrated fragments of text written by W.G. Sebald, Walter Benjamin, and Italo Calvino. Exploring themes such as memory, history, civilization and destruction, the work of these writers is profoundly informed by their experiences of fascism, Nazism and the Second World War. The film re-imagines their writing within the current geopolitical context of Europe, tracing through the city of Athens the entwined histories of empire and ruins.
    Using a Sebaldian juxtaposition of photographs and text, the film seeks to generate new and unexpected connections and resonances; between the past and the present, between colliding narratives and histories. As in Sebald’s work, the film’s narrator is a peripatetic wanderer, a figure who, in the context of the refugee crisis, evokes one of the most pressing issue of our current times. Weaving together textual fragments, the film seeks to challenge the monolith of hegemonic historical narrative, proposing instead a poly-focal and multi-vocal perspective of memory and history.
    The presentation will include a screening of the film followed by a lecture exploring the work's political and conceptual concerns.

  • Walk / Talk: The red city inside out: A psychogeography of gendered space through the lens of the female body, specifically focusing on menstruation
    14.30 Outside
    By: Aimee Blease-Bourne
    A derive investigating the forgotten and neglected aspects of urban space. Specifically, we will use the themes of menstruation, as a lens to explore the city: the city as a metaphor for the body. How does the urban landscape reflect the themes? Menstruation is hidden and shameful within western capitalism. It has strong negative connotations. By exploring menstruation in the city we can RESIST capitalist tactics. We can create radical social change with de-tournament: we can sabotage and re-appropriate signs through menstrual activism, or menarchy! On the walk, we will take photographs, log our positions on a map and record words in response to the spaces we experience. During the indoor session, we will use these representations to re-create the city, and our walk, into a piece of art.

    Note: This event is followed by a talk in the main room at 15:30. This walk is limited to 15 participants.

  • Walk: Algorithm Walks
    15.00 Outside
    By: Tim Waters
    We will explore the notion that following a set of rules is more liberating that just walking wherever. Towns and cities are planned to be attractive to walkers, and moving based on emotions and behaviour is another prescribed use. Some streets and areas might feel off and you might give it a miss. Place-making aimed at making towns 'walk friendly' where walk friendly is shopper and heritage friendly means that for many, psychogeography is just another thing to be consumed in that space. If we follow your own intuition and wander down interesting or attractive ways, and avoiding the unattractive, might this limit us? Could we use structured algorithms and random chance in how we walk to break out of prescribed habits? Based on the success of Tim’s walk in last year’s programme, this year’s will work with much smaller groups (4 people max in each group) to answer these questions. At the beginning the participants will be in one big group and will get an introduction to the psychogeographic theory behind algorithmic walking and be encouraged to write down on paper at some 'algorithms'. These pieces of paper will be handed back in and then shuffled up and when the groups split up they will each take a sheet, and head outside.
    When outside, the participants will actively follow the algorithms. Control groups of intuitive wanderers will also be chosen. Walkers will make sure they have returned to the venue 15 mins before the end for sharing insights and ideas.

  • Talk: The red city inside out: A psychogeography of gendered space through the lens of the female body, specifically focusing on menstruation
    15.30 Main Room, S2R
    By: Aimee Blease-Bourne
    A derive investigating the forgotten and neglected aspects of urban space. Specifically, we will use the themes of menstruation, as a lens to explore the city: the city as a metaphor for the body. How does the urban landscape reflect the themes? Menstruation is hidden and shameful within western capitalism. It has strong negative connotations. By exploring menstruation in the city we can RESIST capitalist tactics. We can create radical social change with de-tournament: we can sabotage and re-appropriate signs through menstrual activism, or menarchy! On the walk, we will take photographs, log our positions on a map and record words in response to the spaces we experience. During the indoor session, we will use these representations to re-create the city, and our walk, into a piece of art.

    Note: This event is preceeded by a walk at 14:30

  • Walk / Discussion: A Dérive around Huddersfield
    15:30 Outside & Break-out Room
    By: Alec Shepley & Paul Jones
    UK artists Shepley and Jones will take as their starting point Michael Philipson’s provocation to uncover those spaces that culture has not reached and to take Philipson further, to excavate those spaces or gaps that culture has somehow forgotten or that progress has left behind. Through the everyday practice walking, Shepley will sweep-trace the ‘ley-lines’ left by architects and urban planners, and Jones will conduct data-collection experiments.
    Through tracing and sweeping they will contour urban features, cracks and gaps, delineations and boundaries, exploring differences in the infrastructure precipitated by utopian and dystopian templates, and in-so-doing expose something between art and life - even if only momentarily. Data sweep drawings are often by-products of this process and the artists would hope to produce some for the Congress as a record of their dérives.
    They propose starting from S2R Create Space, with a group of up to 20 to join, and then proceed – drifting through a district of the city. The walk will last one hour (within a two-hour slot) allowing time for introductions, the walk, and then discussion.

    Note: Limited to 20 people. Paul and Alec invite participants to bring along a sweeping brush, broom, litter grabber, duster or anything to sweep along the walk.

  • Talk: Nightwalking
    16.15 Main Room, S2R
    By: Lloyd Spenser
    This is a record of night walking in the suburbs, and in the centre, of Leeds. These night walks were solitary. Most of them were undertaken around midnight. When my partner, Sara died on the last night of November 2015 it brought to end a decade during which I had been closely involved with two women, Ann and Sara, living with a diagnosis of terminal cancer. Each lived actively and independently for six and a half years. (Ann died in November 2012). But for each of them the last year was the most difficult, and for me, the most demanding.
    During 2015 I found myself getting very little opportunity for exercise. I was with Sara almost every day till well after 10pm. The same pattern was followed during the weeks of Sara's last stay in St. Gemma's Hospice. I would leave only after Sara had fallen asleep.

    Note: This is to accompany Lloyds photography exhibition which is in the venue today.

  • talk: Drift In-between
    16.45 Main Room, S2R
    By: Bridget Sheridan
    Guy Debord’s concept of the drift offers a different way of engaging with space. He believes that a map can be a way of entering into a drift. There are, in fact, several ways one can enter into a drift. Many walking artists, such as Tim Knowles and his wind walks, have explored the playful use of the protocole. Could this be a way of leaving behind all of one’s habitual ways of walking in order to create an aesthetic experience (following the definition of John Dewey’s experience in art)?
    As a walking artist, I have recently questioned the drift in walking art and its relationship to discovering a new territory. For a commissioned project, Drift With Me, I was asked to explore the territory of a small village in the South West of France and to interact with its habitants. Thus, I decided to wander round the streets and paths, hoping to find people who were willing to anticipate in the project. The constraint was for me to film the path and then, afterwards, to project the video of the moving landscape onto their hands creating. They would then get lost in their everyday territory. The potter’s bowls would be deformed, the weaver would accidentally go the wrong way. The drift had begun with me, and continued with the inhabitants of Bordes.
    I believe that the projected image has a power of creating a territory of the in-between, that it can lead the walker into a drift. As screens of all sorts mislead us in the streets, billboards, signs and smartphones open up space, hence drawing us into the depths of the digital world before throwing us instantly back into our everyday life, I question how the projected image can affect our perception of walking.

    Note: Bridget is running a night walk later today at 20:30

  • Participative Performance: Odersfelt Unorchestra
    17.30 Main Room, S2R & then outside
    By: Jason Kelly & Graeme Murrell
    A short performance of non-idiomatic improvised music, played on a selection of instruments and found items by either a 4 or 5 piece band. The instruments will include many items either bought or found in Huddersfield, from tea tray gong and road sign wobble board to animal voice boxes and ripped artist pads.
    We will perform in the round, with the audience in the centre of the space, though don't be surprised if we also wander about a bit. The performance can be viewed as a whole although we also encourage listeners to just dip in for a brief period, we don't intend for a formal concert environment.
    The piece will culminate in audience participation with various noise making devices being distributed amongst the audience who will then be lead out of the performance space to make a racket in the street. If weather and circumstances are right we will then lead a short circular procession which will return to the venue.

  • Night Walk with Projection: Drift In-between
    20.30 Outside
    By: Bridget Sheriden
    Guy Debord’s concept of the drift offers a different way of engaging with space. He believes that a map can be a way of entering into a drift. There are, in fact, several ways one can enter into a drift. Many walking artists, such as Tim Knowles and his wind walks, have explored the playful use of the protocole. Could this be a way of leaving behind all of one’s habitual ways of walking in order to create an aesthetic experience (following the definition of John Dewey’s experience in art)?
    As a walking artist, I have recently questioned the drift in walking art and its relationship to discovering a new territory. For a commissioned project, Drift With Me, I was asked to explore the territory of a small village in the South West of France and to interact with its habitants. Thus, I decided to wander round the streets and paths, hoping to find people who were willing to anticipate in the project. The constraint was for me to film the path and then, afterwards, to project the video of the moving landscape onto their hands creating. They would then get lost in their everyday territory. The potter’s bowls would be deformed, the weaver would accidentally go the wrong way. The drift had begun with me, and continued with the inhabitants of Bordes.
    I believe that the projected image has a power of creating a territory of the in-between, that it can lead the walker into a drift. As screens of all sorts mislead us in the streets, billboards, signs and smartphones open up space, hence drawing us into the depths of the digital world before throwing us instantly back into our everyday life, I question how the projected image can affect our perception of walking.

    Note: Walk is limited to 16 people during which 8 walkers will take turns to share supplied portable projection units.

  • Exhibition: Nightwalking
    All Day Indoors, S2R
    By: Lloyd Spenser
    This is a record of night walking in the suburbs, and in the centre, of Leeds. These night walks were solitary. Most of them were undertaken around midnight. When my partner, Sara died on the last night of November 2015 it brought to end a decade during which I had been closely involved with two women, Ann and Sara, living with a diagnosis of terminal cancer. Each lived actively and independently for six and a half years. (Ann died in November 2012). But for each of them the last year was the most difficult, and for me, the most demanding.
    During 2015 I found myself getting very little opportunity for exercise. I was with Sara almost every day till well after 10pm. The same pattern was followed during the weeks of Sara's last stay in St. Gemma's Hospice. I would leave only after Sara had fallen asleep.

    Note: Lloyd is doing a talk at 16:15 about his work.

  • exhbition: 25 pockets of [...]
    All Day Indoors, S2R
    By: Victor Beuhring
    People -focused ‘modes of experimental behaviour’ and drifts emphasizing unplanned, interpersonal encounters, interactions and transactions can create new possibilities for détournement and new situations where the affective impact of people and places combine and flow together in a shared aesthetic sense.
    25 pockets of [...] is an interactive drift and social assemblage project I use to randomly journey through cityscapes via unplanned encounters, interactions and transactions. Participants give away to the project an object possession and write on a picture frame, directions for the next location and person, or 'pocket' to be visited in a particular city. The trail of referrals from person to person continues in any particular city until at least 25 objects from 25 referrals have been collected. The objects are later incorporated into a final, framed collage.
    Participants in [25] Pockets of […] have included: museum curators, car salesmen, teachers, bankers, artists, musicians, baristas, retail workers, dog walkers, professors, street cleaners, a Dean of a cathedral, a BBC presenter, a homeless poet, a renowned violin virtuoso, ‘someone with a cold’, a 'six foot tall blonde woman', to name but a few. Instead of mapping out and arriving at a fixed definition of the pictorial or discursive identity and substance of a place, it is hoped that [25] Pockets of […] conveys the affective flavour of a city as a dynamic variation of interpersonal relations and transactions.

Who Took Part in 2017?

Graeme Murrell
Graeme Murrell is an artist based in Huddersfield. His interest is mostly connected to experimental multimedia works involving text, sound and performance. Since the 1990s, he has been involved with several publication projects such as Frontal Lobe, a small press magazine of poetry, scurrilous writing and other rants and Electric Dogs, an unpublished novel. He has also been the member of avant-jazz band Trump and later the freeform music group the 'F*ks and the duo The Importance Of...' He is the editor of the website Monocular Times which curates Situationist writing and other writing and hosts the site of pressure group Huddersfield Gem who are dedicated to the preservation of Huddersfield’s Queensgate Market. He is the member of the Sedentary Committee for the Consideration of Gradual Change and continues to curate the Institute for the Preservation of Bad Art, which is dedicated to saving poorly executed artworks from landfill. He devised and led ‘Over Here Over There’ which was a psychogeographical exploration of the territory between twin towns in West Yorkshire and the Ruhr Valley.
Fenella Brandenberg & David Bollinger
Bollinger and Brandenberg are world leading psychogeographers. They didn't send in a detailed biography but the curious are encouraged to watch for further information which will be revealed on these guest blogs: http://particulations.blogspot.co.uk and https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com
Annie Watson
My PhD is about female film directors, and why they are in the minority. Research so far tends to highlight the gap between education and industry as the moment in which the gender divide increases. I am very interested in exploring this transition, as well as the little researched point of 're-entry' as an older woman into the industry. I am the UK national researcher for a pan-European report mapping where the female film directors are across Europe, due for completion in early 2016. As co-founder of Sheffield Hallam Media Arts Walking Research Group, my project is KNITWALKS. I knit as I walk, and the knitting becomes a map. I worked as a film editor for ten years, before directing music videos with London's INDEPENDENT agency. My promo for IMONSTER'S Daydream in Blue was nominated for Q Award's Video of the Year. I have directed many short films, KNITTING A LOVE SONG being nominated for a BAFTA. I was selected as one of Screen International's Stars of Tomorrow and have written three feature films.
Morag Rose
Morag Rose has developed a unique artistic-activist-academic praxis. She co-founded The LRM (Loiterers Resistance Movement) a psychogeographical collective based in Manchester, UK. Their manifesto says they believe 'our city is wonderful and made for more than shopping. The streets belong to everyone and we want to reclaim them for play and revolutionary fun.' In 2016 The LRM celebrated their tenth birthday with a 3 month extravaganza at Peoples History Museum which included work from over 50 international artists. Morag’s PhD research focuses on psychogeographies, gender and public space and her mission has always been to create a psychogeography that is accessible, diverse and critically engaging. Has it all been a waste of time and space or can the drift lead us towards spatial and social justice?
Ursula Troche
My studies include Intercultural Therapy at Goldsmith’s College, London. Since then I have been giving papers at conferences and most of my work, both theoretical and practical, is broadly based on intercultural and therapeutic themes. I write and perform poetry and give workshops, many of them therapeutic writing workshops, some of them in daycentres. Performances include the Human Rights Festival and the Colour of London Festival; Poetry collections include ‘Embraceable – Notes from Different Places called Home’. I am also on the Introductory Course of the Philadelphia Association for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.
Phil Smith
Dr. Phil Smith has claws in several different worlds. One, large and wide, is in performance and music theatre [he has written more than 100 plays for companies including St Petersburg State Comedy Theatre, Opera North and Perpetual Motion, and he is dramaturg with TNT (Munich)]. From site-specific performances in South Devon beach huts, lidos, tea shops and other unconventional settings, to mis-guides in National Trust properties, to counter-tours and drifts in city streets,Crab Man has long practised what he preaches in this Handbook. He is Associate Professor in the School of Humanities and Performing Arts at the University of Plymouth and a visiting lecturer at the University of Exeter. He is also one of four core member of a group of artist-researchers called Wrights and Sites, who have generated a range of mis-guides, performances, possible cities and forests and other wonders.
Roy Bayfield
Roy Bayfield has appeared in a list of 'exemplary ambulatory explorers', is well known for his explorations of the notorious Argleton (a Google Maps un-town) and is one of the small group of contemporary walker-writers who are stepping out beyond the work of W.G. Sebald, Will Self and Iain Sinclair. He is the author of Desire Paths: Real Walks to Nonreal Places (Triarchy Press, 2016) and of a chapter in Walking Inside Out (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).
Ally Standing
Ally Standing is a Birmingham based visual artist and writer, with a psychogeographic, interdisciplinary practice, exploring ideas surrounding the built environment. Post-war architecture, postmodern space, and public art are some of her main areas of research. Ally also lectures in Contextual Studies at Birmingham City University's School of Visual Communication.
Gavin Rogers
Gavin Rogers is an international artist, performer and socially engaged researcher living and working in the United Kingdom. His practice is situated across a range of media from performance to sculpture. Gavin has particular interest in the area of identity; juxtaposing, stereotyping and discovering personal, social and psychogeographical identities though visual, textual and verbal languages. Alongside his artistic practice Gavin runs workshops, seminars, lectures and teaching sessions within and outside of academia including: being the curator of the USA to UK Creative Exchange for Fulbright Scholars and coordinating the National Art Saturday Club.
Rob Kilner
Rob is a walker and photographer from Leeds.
Sonia Overall
Sonia teaches on the Creative and Professional Writing programme at Canterbury Christ Church University. She writes fiction and poetry and explores experimental creative forms. She is an avid psychogeographer and draws on walking practices, psychogeography and place-based methods in her writing and research.She is the founder of Peregrinations: Walking and Landscape Research Group in the School of Humanities, and of an international network of walking creatives and academics, Women Who Walk @womenwhowalknet
Gopal Dutta
Gopal Dutta is a filmmaker whose works have previously aired at the Leeds International Film Festival.
Gareth Rees
I am the founder of the website Unofficial Britain, and author of Marshland (Influx Press, 2013). My work has featured in anthologies including An Unreliable Guide to London (Influx Press), Mount London (Penned in the Margins), Acquired for Development By... [Influx Press], Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography (Rowman & Littlefield), The Ashgate Companion to Paranormal Cultures (Ashgate), and the spoken word album A Dream Life of Hackney Marshes (Clay Pipe Music).
Elia Rita
Elia Rita is a Spanish artist based in San Francisco. Her current practice looks into the act of walking as performative response to the understanding of the everyday beyond its known frontiers. The assumed transience of the public space and its normative use is confronted with the assumed permanence of the notion of home through public interventions and intimate performances. Delving into new realities is possible in any place at any time; one’s presence there is all that is need. Her actions seek for poetic purposes and take place in the terrain of the absurd - where art does its best - where ethics and aesthetics aren’t constrained to the burdens of logic.
Sara Rees
I’m an artist and curator based in Cardiff, Wales. Awarded First Class Honours in Visual Performance at Dartington College of Arts, I later gained Masters in Fine Art at Cardiff School of Art & Design with Distinction. I have been the recipient of a number of awards and prizes, including a Creative Wales Award and The Leverhulme Trust Award, and my work is exhibited internationally. Conceptually driven, I work across mediums, including video, photography, performance, installation, intervention, writing, and relational art. Over the course of my practice a constellation of spatial themes has emerged, concerned with the politics and poetics of space, memory and history in relation to place, and ruins as a site of both trauma and transformation. Arising from this territory, and inextricably interwoven through it, are questions about the nature of time, liminality and subjectivity. Whilst I often present work within a gallery context, a vital strand of my practice is site-specific, creating artworks for a diverse range of sites, from bucolic woodlands to a derelict ex-Soviet power station. Responding as much to aspects of a given site as to contemporary global conditions, and often blurring the boundaries between reality and fiction, my work seeks to be both playful and provocative.
Lloyd Spenser
I first became seriously involved in photography while working for the anti-Apartheid publishing house, Ravan Press in Johannesburg, South Africa. Then (1981-2) and later in Wigan and Manchester I helped start and run film and photography workshops and helped mount several photographic exhibitions in what I thought of as ‘documentary’ mode. Together with John Davies, I helped found the Counter Image photographic workshop in Manchester. As well as editing a book of essays by John Berger and working with him on his major statement on photography, Another Way of Telling, I have written two ‘comic books’ on philosophy, Hegel for Beginners and The Enlightenment for Beginners. I spent a quarter of a century teaching undergraduates and have run a number of on-line courses and workshops on various aspects of photography and on creativity generally. In addition to the exhibition on Briggate, I conducted a second long-term photographic project exploring night life on the streets of inner-city Leeds with Stephen Griffin. At present I am working on a series of projects involving portraiture, foliage and forests, and dance photography.
Victor Buehring
Victor uses collaborative artistic goals to create and explore the systems and social forces behind aesthetic experience and uses art to set a sequence of operations into motion to generate new events and new object forms.
Claudia Sternberg
Claudia is Senior Research Associate at the European Institute, University College London, UK. She holds a PhD from Cambridge and an MA from Yale, and taught and researched at Oxford for six years before joining University College
Russell King
Russell runs his own business consultancy based in Halifax, concerned with major events. He has over 30 years’ experience stretching back to some of the major disasters of the 1980s, which has latterly included involvement in the 2012 London Olympics and the 2014 Tour de France Grand Depart Yorkshire.
Bridget Sheridan
Bridget is a researcher in visual arts. Her research investigates the relationship between art walking, the landscape and memory. Besides teaching art at Jean Jaures University in Toulouse, her own artwork has been exhibited by various galleries and art centres in Europe.
Simon Bradley
Simon is an Ambulant Sound Artist & Oral Historian based in Leeds.
Andrea Capstick
Andrea is Senior Lecturer in Dementia Studies and Programme Leader in the MSc Dementia Studies at the University of Bradford, and also a Fellow of the National Institute for Health Research.
Tyson Mitman
Tyson Mitman has spent most of his adult life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, though he now resides in York, UK. His work is primarily about graffiti, space, power, resistance, and identity. Though he is also interested in areas of subjectivity, subculture studies, visual culture, theories of democracy, access to political voice and agency, morality. He believes graffiti is a legitimate form of art and expression, and that some things just look better covered in a bunch of tags.
Aimee Blease-Bourne
Doctor Aimee Blease-Bourne is a researcher investigating connections between people and places through creative, counter-cultural and exploratory experiences, which weaves into her quest for self-exploration. In her first published book, 'Guarding Sacred Sites', Aimee uses psychogeographical techniques to create alternative histories for a particularly contested and ancient landscape in the Peak District National Park, Stanton Moor. Her academic focus then shifted from the shadows of the past, venturing boldly into the unknown realms of personal empowerment, through community-based explorations. She actively experiences and values the diverse, yet close knit community in her quirky village. She is very proud to have worked with locals to set up a community group helping people fleeing from war torn countries. Aimee is currently writing her new book with a fellow village resident to explore experiences of menstruation. She has utilised the tool of psychogeography to investigate the body as a landscape: her work aims to break taboos, smash the silence and remove her censor. One of Aimee's most favourite things is music. She helps to organise music festivals and loves banging her drum in the political folk band Muddy Summers and the Dirty Field Whores!
Brendan Bootland, Suzanne Elliott, & Nick Hartley
Brendan Bootland and Nick Hartley, Suzanne Elliott are part of the Walk the Talk collective. #walkthetalk happened in 2015 when clinical psychologists and their supporters walked 100 miles from Leicester to London. There was a growing sense at this time that psychologists needed to stand up and speak out more, particularly at a political level in terms of how social issues and policies effect our wellbeing and how change was needed at a wider level. #walkthetalk2015 was an opportunity to step outside, unite and walk together in the name of social justice. WalkTheTalk2015.org
Witold Van Ratingen
Witold van Ratingen is a psychogeographer and flâneur-en-dehors-de-residence at the Institute of Incoherent Geography. He lives in Utrecht, the Netherlands, where he spends a great deal of time daydreaming about pedestrian escape routes from his damp and landscapeless homeland as well as his mind-numbing professional life as a public transport consultant. Witold was recently awarded his MA degree from the New School for Social Research, studying under McKenzie Wark and writing an expansive critical survey of psychogeographic theory titled Loitering With Intent. 
Kevin Boniface
Kevin Boniface is an artist who lives and bases his practice in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. His work is an ongoing journal realised primarily through text, film and photography. His research and methodology evolve from the continuous field recording of his immediate surroundings to create a social survey of people and things in the landscape: a written record of dialogue and dialect, a catalogue of flora and fauna, the tracking of social mobility, the slow migration up Market Street of a discarded shoe...The online incarnation of Kevin’s journal, The Most Difficult Thing Ever was awarded Best Writing at the 2012 Blog North Awards.
For 4wcop, Kevin will present The Most Difficult Thing Ever in a live collaboration with musicians Beeves and Marc Layton-Bennett. Beeves and ML-B are both accomplished writers, performers and producers who regularly work in live, studio and educational settings. ML-B has been the drummer with the band Jah Wobble & The Invaders Of The Heart for the past 8 years. He was also involved in the 2011 Psychic Life album which Wobble described as being “inspired by disco, post-punk and psychogeography”. Beeves’ ambient work makes immersive use of everyday soundscapes, manipulating and complimenting the sounds that surround him. In their joint project, Sonic Vandalism, ML-B and Beeves scour the streets of Huddersfield for objects and street furniture to re-purpose as musical instruments. KevinBoniface.co.uk
Alec Shepley
Alec is Head of the School of Creative Arts and Professor of Contemporary Art Practice at Wrexham Glyndŵr University. Prior to his appointment at Wrexham Glyndŵr University in March 2016 he was Head of Lincoln School of Art & Design at the University of Lincoln. Alec’s individual and collaborative research has attracted funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council, the British Council, the Arts Council of England and the Arts Council of Wales and his work has been exhibited widely, both nationally and internationally, with examples held in a number of public and private collections in north America, Europe and Asia. He has been an active participant in national and international artistic research seminars and conferences for several years and his individual and socio-collaborative art research has attracted funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council, the British Council, the Arts Council of England and the Arts Council of Wales. Through extending the language of painting and sculpture his works become more a means of encounter rather than an end in themselves, providing a document of art as social engagement. Through intertwining reality and fiction,he produces improvised sites that are dialectically linked replies to one another within the wider field of action.
Paul Jones
Paul leads on performance, video, photography, digital media, sound, installation and socially engaged art practices. Paul’s work is based on geography as an epistemological structure visualised through performance, video, photography, sound and drawing. From balancing acts and attempted border leaps, antagonistic border greeting performances to flag waving, Paul’s practice is concerned with the political, cultural and social systems that govern territory. He works collaboratively with artist Guy Mayman as part of DATAMOSH, developing hallucinatory visuals and ritualistic performances that reanimate a large archive of visual material. As a process of exploration and data mining the work responds to an excess of visual and audio material through deconstruction and re-contextualisation. Paul has exhibited widely in the UK and internationally including g39, Cardiff; Motorcade Flash Parade, Bristol; AC Institute, New York; A.T.P Gallery, London and MOTI, Breda. Contributions to conferences and publications include ‘Croeso I Gymru /Welcome to England – Performing the Welsh/English Border’, Art and Geopolitical Borders conference, MMU; ‘Cerbyd as Project’, Numbers Publication, ‘Small Town Kids’, Dazed and Confused magazine.
Jason Kerry
Alex Bridger
Alex Bridger works at the University of Huddersfield teaching critical and community psychology and approaches to research including psychogeography and the analysis of media texts and political rhetoric. He also involved with chairing the Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network and is currently writing a book titled Psychogeography and Psychology. You can contact him and/or find out more about his work at
Email: a.j.bridger@hud.ac.uk, University Staff profile
Facebook: Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network
Blog: https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com
Tim Waters
Tim is a psychogeographer, digital humanities enthusiast and freelance geographer. He likes historical maps. He's worked with many libraries and museums on historical maps, temporal geographies and vague fuzzy vernacular spaces. He has been part of Leeds Psychogeography Group and organises the annual Terminalia Festival of Psychogeography. He's also responsible for this website.
Phil Wood
Phil Wood is the Urban Therapist, an intercultural path-beater scavenging the discarded edgelands of our settlements and memories; confronting us with our hubristic follies and rekindling our capacity for compassion and community. He works and walks all over the world but has never really left Huddersfield.
Web: http://philwood.eu/
Blog: http://subversiveurbanism.tumblr.com
@PhilWood11
David Smith
Dave is the Public Engagement Officer at Heritage Quay, the archive of the University of Huddersfield. He spends most days drifting in the collections, mostly not for an invited audience. He also spends a lot of time with spreadsheets and feedback forms. And biscuits.

2016 Huddersfield. Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography

Friday 9th September 2016

  • Walk: Harold Wilson's Turbo Dérive
    1.45pm - 3.15pm St. George's Square (Train Station)
    By: Phill Harding
    In a special 'warm-up' event, Phill Harding will lead a silent walk of rapid passage and high velocity through Huddersfield, following a dynamic algorithmically derived route. Departing from the statue of Harold Wilson outside the Railway Station (St George's Square), this will be an energetic walk of one hour's duration, full of surprises. Come prepared!

    Note: The walk is for 1 hour and leaves on the dot at 2pm so please arrive at 1.45-1.50 for a bit of a preamble and chat.

  • Talk: Psychogeography Extreme
    4pm - 5pm Heritage Quay
    By: Phil Smith
    What is the future for psychogeography? To open the Congress, Phil Smith, in this talk, proposes future shifts in contemporary Psychogeography for a walking that is both quest and architecture and against a ‘Spectacle’ that invades subjectivity and pixilates public space. Phil will argue for an ecological walking that acknowledges the malevolence of the planet’s molten centre, for the taking back of the surplus of pleasure, and for new ‘grounds’ for a politics of the anti-Spectacle where our entanglement with distant things changes the here and now

    Note: This event will be streamed live

  • Walk: Scavenger's Hunt
    5pm - 6.30pm (90 mins) Heritage Quay and then around University Campus
    By: Sophia Emmanouil
    Calling scavengers young and old to follow a trail around the university campus in the search of items and stories, mundane or otherwise. The findings of the explorations will be exhibited in the Instant Museum of Curiosities at Heritage Quay, so come with a playful mood and an enquiring mind.

    Note: This event will be streamed live

  • Talk: A Walk in the Park
    7.30pm - 9pm Heritage Quay
    By: Travis Elborough
    Travis will present an illustrated, peripatetic survey of urban green space drawing on the material in his latest book A Walk in the Park (just out in Penguin), described as ‘fascinating, informative, revelatory’ by William Boyd in The Guardian, and his research during a residency in Victoria Park in East London with the Chisenhale Gallery in 2014-5. With their origins in aristocratic hunting preserves. Elborough argues that public parks have often proffered tame wildness to tame the wildness of the urban poor. As such their histories are steeped in age-old battles over land and liberty, work and leisure, taste and class, while currently they stand imperilled by government austerity measures and the invidious privatisation of free public space. This talk is not to be missed!

    Note: Before this event be sure to join Travis and come to Greenhead Park at 6pm for a walk led by David Griffiths author of "Secured for the Town- The Story of Huddersfield’s Greenhead Park". There’s more details at the Friends of Greenhead Park website.

Saturday 10th September 2016

  • Talk: What is Psychogeography
    11.30am - 12pm (30 mins) Heritage Quay
    By: Alex Bridger
    Is it simply about walking, that brings in psychology and geography or is it an artistic, literary or political practice? Psychogeography can be all of these and can be drawn on by anyone to take a fresh look at many aspects of living, working and leisure.

    Note: This event will be streamed live

  • Walk: The Northern Powerhouse in a post-Brexit world
    12pm - 2pm (75 mins) Start at Heritage Quay and then around town
    By: Alex Bridger
    Alex Bridger leads a walk around the town centre thinking about consumerism, surveillance, security and ownership before returning to Heritage Quay to create DIY maps showing just where the power lies.

    Note: Free walk but please sign up on Eventbrite for a ticket as space is limited.

  • Walk: Walking over Mines
    12pm - 2pm (105 mins) Start at Heritage Quay
    By: Tim Waters
    Tim will lead you over the labyrinth of concealed and invisible coal workings that lie just beneath the surface of Huddersfield town centre. His psychogeographic insights will give you a whole new view on the stuff beneath our streets.

    Note: This event will be streamed live

  • Walk: Ghost Trails of Diaspora
    2pm - 3pm Heritage Quay
    By: Phil Wood
    Phil Wood draws upon a deep knowledge of the migrant groups which have settled in Huddersfield as well as many of their places of origin. He will describe remarkable journeys and uncovers some strange and surprising concurrences whilst walking, one foot in Huddersfield and one elsewhere.

    Note: This event will be streamed live

  • Talk: The Studentification of Urban Space
    3pm - 4pm Heritage Quay
    By: Tina Richardson
    Tina Richardson will discuss the rise of privately owned halls of residences in university towns and cities. By providing examples from Huddersfield and Leeds, and revealing her own model of studentification, Tina will demonstrate how private student housing conforms to the new wave of capitalism: aesthetic capitalism.

  • Walk: Getting Lost on Purpose
    4pm - 6pm (105 mins) Start at Heritage Quay and then wherever
    By: Tim Waters
    Participants will devise unconventional rules and methods for walking (such as a flip of a coin or dice or following odd patterns), and then put them into practice around town. By getting lost on purpose we move across the streets in a way we haven't done before which can lead us to new insights about how we use the spaces and places we are in. We may get lost so let's see where you end up!

    Note: Free walk but please sign up on Eventbrite for a ticket as space is limited. This event will be streamed live

  • Panel: Any Other Business
    6pm (15 mins) Heritage Quay
    By: All
    Let's all meet back from our walks to take part in the Motion of No Confidence and formal Dis-Assembly of the 4th World Congress of Psychogeography, including any expulsions, unresignations and votes.

Who Took Part in 2016?

Phil Smith
Phil Smith (Crab Man, Mytho) is a performance-maker, writer and ambulatory researcher, specialising in creating performances related to walking, site-specificity, mythogeographies and counter-tourism. He is a core member of site-based arts collective Wrights & Sites, presently working on a new publication: ‘Architect Walkers’. He is currently developing ‘common dance for threatened subjectivities’ with Melanie Kloetzel and is a Site Artist for Tracing the Pathway’s ‘Groundwork’ project in Milton Keynes. He occasionally teaches site-specific performance at Plymouth University. Phil’s projects and publications include ‘A Footbook of Zombie Walking’ and ‘Walking’s New Movement’ (2015), ‘On Walking’ and ‘Enchanted Things’ (2014), ‘Counter-Tourism: The Handbook’ (2012) and ‘Mythogeography’ (2010).
Sophia Emmanouil
Sophia designs and facilitates a range of creative projects in partnership with schools, health and arts organisations, community groups and other voluntary and community collectives. Sophia's research, which incorporates Situationist approaches to space, place and mapping, transgresses architecture, design and education, and takes experimental approaches to sustainability and psychogeography. Her work also considers art, design and architecture from a public engagement perspective. Sophia is also part of a collective of radical researchers from the University of East London and the University of Huddersfield looking at ways of producing critical knowledge through walking, mapping and arts.
Travis Elborough
Travis Elborough has been a freelance writer, author and cultural commentator for more than a decade now. His books include The Bus We Loved a history of the Routemaster bus; The Long Player Goodbye, a hymn to vinyl records; Wish You Were Here, a survey of the British beside the seaside and London Bridge in America; The Tall Story of a Transatlantic Crossing. The most recent book A Walk in the Park; The Life and Times of a People's Institution was published by Jonathan Cape in June 2016 and described as "a fascinating, informative, revelatory book" by William Boyd in The Guardian.
Alex Bridger
Alex Bridger works at the University of Huddersfield teaching critical and community psychology and approaches to research including psychogeography and the analysis of media texts and political rhetoric. He also involved with chairing the Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network and is currently writing a book titled Psychogeography and Psychology. You can contact him and/or find out more about his work at
Email: a.j.bridger@hud.ac.uk, University Staff profile
Facebook: Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network
Blog: https://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com
Tim Waters
Tim is a psychogeographer, digital humanities enthusiast and freelance geographer. He likes historical maps. He's worked with many libraries and museums on historical maps, temporal geographies and vague fuzzy vernacular spaces. He has been part of Leeds Psychogeography Group and organises the annual Terminalia Festival of Psychogeography. He's also responsible for this website.
Phil Wood
Phil Wood is the Urban Therapist, an intercultural path-beater scavenging the discarded edgelands of our settlements and memories; confronting us with our hubristic follies and rekindling our capacity for compassion and community. He works and walks all over the world but has never really left Huddersfield.
Web: http://philwood.eu/
Blog: http://subversiveurbanism.tumblr.com
@PhilWood11
Tina Richardson
Tina Richardson specialises in the field of urban cultural studies. Having received her PhD at the University of Leeds in 2014 she is now an independent scholar, working as an editor-writer, guest lecturer and consultant. Tina’s latest edited volume has been published by Rowman and Littlefield International : Walking Inside Out - Contemporary British Psychogeography (2015). From a cultural theory and psychogeography background, Tina specialises in - identity and place, the application of poststructural theory to space, and the appearance of urban space under neoliberalism.
Schizocartography Website: http://www.schizocartography.org/
Blog: http://particulations.blogspot.co.uk/
Twitter : @concretepost
David Smith
David the Participation and Engagement Officer at Heritage Quay. Dave spends his days dreaming up ideas for strange and wonderful experiences at Heritage Quay and he'll be the one running round with a clipboard and risk assessment.
Phill Harding
Phill Harding is a West Yorkshire based multidisciplinary artist who also works with sound in a primarily visual arts context. His work is often site specific and always site- and context-responsive. Sometimes this takes the form of large-scale installations, leading groups in sound walks through spaces, with film and musical compositions. Phill is very interested in the flux of time and the specifics of our present moment in it, and in our psychological responses to the places / spaces we inhabit.
Web: phillharding.org
The Bored in the City Collective
The bored in the city collective are a motley group of psychogeographers, artists, writers and poets that reside in the Manchester region. Over the past 15 years they have produced numerous situationist inspired leaflets, zines, comic books and DIY maps in relation to reflecting on the capitalist gentrification of Manchester city centre, the war on terror and a critique of spectacular society. They have been involved in numerous stunts and interventions and their greatest achievement has been the levitation of both bus stations in Manchester June 2008. You can contact them at Boredinthecity@hotmail.co.uk

Previous World Congresses

The First World Congress of Psychogeography took place in June of 2015 in two locations at the same time – Huddersfield and Leeds. The Congress was convened in order to host the launch of an edited collection of essays about current psychogeography in the United Kingdom (Read the Walking Inside Out Introduction PDF) edited by Tina Richardson and also to invite the Class Wargames collective to do a talk and to show how Debord’s Game of War works as a situationist board game with the aims being to use wargaming as a metaphor to explore the social relations of capitalism. Arguably, the hosting of these two events shifted the ley lines and seismic energies in the Northern Heartlands, as evidenced by a seventh levitation of the Odeon Cinema in Huddersfield. Members of the World Congress of Psychogeographers have previously levitated the Odeon Cinema a further six times previously in recent years! The second and third World Congresses may take place next year or they may indeed have already happened. David Bollinger the District Commissioner of the West Yorkshire Federation of Psychogeographers claims that that the second and third Congresses took place on June the 21st in 1984 and 2012, but we as the Huddersfield Psychogeography Network, argue that such claims are spurious. There are indeed some irreconcilable differences between Mr David Bollinger and the Huddersfield Psychogeographical Network with possible and necessary resignations from positions which may be required in the near foreseeable future.
Interested readers can read a text about Bollinger 'Either put on these glasses or start eating that trash can! Psychogeographically walking with John Nada, Beryl Curt and David Bollinger' by Alex J Bridger

For more details about the first World Congress check out the following links: http://particulations.blogspot.co.uk/2015/05/the-world-congress-of-perambulatory.htmlhttps://notanotherpsychogeographyblog.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/world-congress-of-perambulatory-sutures-huddersfield-and-leeds-1314-may-2015/